UK's Horror Channel to Do The Devil's Business and Get Stiff this May! - Dread Central
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UK’s Horror Channel to Do The Devil’s Business and Get Stiff this May!

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Da Vinci's Demons: Go Behind-the-Scenes with David Goyer; Watch Two Clips from Episode 1.03 - The PrisonerHeading into May, the UK’s Horror Channel have a number of impressive UK premieres up their sleeves – including Sean Hogan’s terrifically chilling The Devil’s Business (review here) and Keith Wright’s touching and modest Harold’s Going Stiff.

And that’s not all! They’ll also be screening Colin Theys’ Remains and presenting a “Director’s Night with Eli Roth.” Read on for all the dates and details.

22:55, Sat May 4 – HAROLD’S GOING STIFF (2011)
Keith Wright’s very funny and surprisingly touching tale investigates a mystery illness turning men in the north of England into something resembling bloodthirsty ghouls. One such victim is Harold (Stan Rowe), an old man whose transformation into something sub-human might just be arrested by the love of Penny (Sarah Spencer), a dedicated home care nurse. But a group of vigilantes have other ideas.

22:55, Sat May 11 – THE DEVIL’S BUSINESS (2011)
Two hit men, Pinner (Billy Clarke), a cynical veteran, and the inexperienced Cully (Jack Gordon), are sent to murder an old associate of their underworld boss. But things are not all what they seem in their quarry’s house, and the duo descend into the shadowy darkness of their own tortured souls. Exuding a palpable atmosphere of claustrophobic dread, this is an eerily effective gem from director Sean Hogan.

UK's Horror Channel to Do The Devil's Business and Get Stiff this May!

22:55, Sat May 18 – REMAINS (2011)
A vacant casino in Nevada becomes a hellish battleground as a group of human survivors fight a hard-core zombie apocalypse in which the infected grow smarter and stronger every day. Based on a graphic novel by Steve Niles, award-winning director Colin Theys’ feature stars Miko Hughes, whom fans may recognise as the little boy from the original Pet Sematary.

21:00, Thurs May 30 – DIRECTOR’S NIGHT WITH ELI ROTH
Roth, famed director of Cabin Fever and Hostel, took time out at FrightFest Glasgow 2013 during the screening of his new film, Aftershock, to wax lyrical on his love of Italian zombie movies as he explains why City of the Living Dead and Demons are such great inspirations for him.

UK's Horror Channel to Do The Devil's Business and Get Stiff this May!

The Horror Channel (official site here) can be found on Sky channel 319 and 198, Virgin 149 and Freesat 138. Follow them on Twitter at twitter.com/horror_channel.

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Three 1970’s Horrors That Remind Us Why We Enjoy Getting Mental at the Movies

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Crazy is always creepy in horror movies, and it usually comes in two forms: insane escapees or the sane among the crazies.

It’s one storytelling technique when a mental patient escapes and enters our own ordered, peaceful world. It’s quite another when a film drops us in the middle of an asylum to cope with crazy people who, in those movies, always seem to want to stab us.

First off, let me say the mentally ill are one of the most misunderstood and scapegoated minorities in movie history. Other stereotypes have disappeared from the silver screen over the years, but it’s still convenient to blame a killing rampage on an escaped mental patient. We’ll just chalk this up to lazy writing and move on.

Yes, “mentally ill” has become shorthand for “bloodthirsty and lacking in social etiquette.” Kudos to “American Horror Story’s” second season, subtitled “Asylum,” for adding some subtlety to that convention. Seventies horror movies, though, were riddled with stereotypes, enough so that when we travel back to that groovy and dangerous time, we can merrily ignore them and enjoy the scare.

Silent Night, Bloody Night (1972) is a fairly standard who-is-the-killer flick that turns terrifying in the last 20 minutes, when all hell breaks loose and the inmates, quite literally, take over the asylum. There is a nice, icy buildup throughout.

The populace of a small town are suspiciously nervous when a local mansion that had once been a mental institution goes up for sale. Mary Woronov (Eating Raoul) plays it numbingly cool throughout, until the climax, adding punch to the big reveals.

Also known by Night of the Dark Full Moon and Death House, this film is directed by Theodore Gershuny and written by Gershuny, Jeffrey Konvitz and Ira Teller. It’s always a good sign for consistency of vision when the director is also a writer.

I don’t know a lot of people raving about this film. It’s certainly not perfect, but a solid effort in that ’70s B-movie category, seriously creepy, and worth watching. Recommended.

Asylum (1972) has everything I enjoy about well-done, early ’70s horror: a fairly simple premise, creepy sets, and solid acting. The anthology setup works well here, stringing four Robert Bloch stories together. Peter Cushing and Herbert Lom show up along with Britt Ekland and Barbara Parkins.

The effects are not at all bad. Hope you view a cut of this movie that shows a stagehand rather obviously moving a prop in the “Frozen Fear” segment because those kinds of mistakes are fun to see.

Directed by Roy Ward Baker, Asylum delivers like any of the Amicus horror movies: similar to Hammer in that you know you will be entertained. Recommended for classic pre-slasher horror movie fans.

Then there’s Don’t Look in the Basement (1973). I was smart enough to see this in a theater when it came out… but dumb enough to bring a date. What a terrible first date movie!

On the other hand, Don’t Look in the Basement is a very creepy horror film due to several elements that come together beautifully:

– First, it has that grainy, cheap look to it like many early ’70s B-movies that, for me, adds to the mood. That look tells me positively this is not a big studio production. “Oh, this is one of THOSE movies,” says my head. “Anything can happen!” Tension builds.

– Second, it has an obviousness to it that can be unnerving when filmed correctly. Hitchcock used to do this well: We in the audience know the danger, but the hero on screen is completely clueless. We know from the minute the blonde nurse accepts her new job she shouldn’t be there — heck, we knew she shouldn’t even have come into the house!

– Third, most all of the characters may be insane, but that doesn’t mean they don’t have their own distinct stories, personalities and phobias. Crazy is not random. As Grant Morrison wrote in Batman: Arkham Asylum, the thoughts of the insane are not unpatterned. Each person has his or her own complex view of reality, no matter how wrong that perception might be.

There’s also a good deal of blood. And a surprise reveal. Don’t Look in the Basement has been recognized as a B-movie classic, and I enthusiastically recommend it here.

Three 1972 to 1973 horror movies and all three recommended! You may or may not disagree, and if so, I want to hear why! What are your favorite asylum flicks? Comment below or on social media.

Gary Scott Beatty’s graphic novel Wounds is available on Amazon and Comixology. Is madness a way to survive the zombie apocalypse? The strangest zombie story ever written, Wounds throws us into a world where nothing is beyond doubt, except a father’s concern for his wife and daughter. If you enjoy that “What th-?” factor in graphic novels, you’ll enjoy Wounds.

For more from Gary Scott Beatty, visit him on Twitter and Facebook.

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Samuel L. Jackson Wraps on M. Night Shyamalan’s Glass

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That was fast. It was just two weeks ago that we shared your first on-set look at Samuel L. Jackson as Mr. Glass in M. Night Shyamalan’s upcoming Unbreakable/Split sequel, and today we have news that Jackson has wrapped his role.

The update comes to us directly from Shyamalan himself who took to Twitter to let us all know that not only has Sam Jackson wrapped his role in Glass, but there is only one week left of filming overall.

Here is his tweet:

Does this mean the crew has gathered up enough footage to give us all a teaser trailer in the near future? I would think so, so let’s not be too surprised if that’s just what we get before the end of the year.

Fingers crossed.

The film is written & directed by M. Night Shyamalan and stars Bruce Willis, James McAvoy, Anya-Taylor Joy, Sarah Paulson, Spencer Treat Clark, Charlayne Woodard, and Samuel L. Jackson as Mr. Glass.

Glass hits theaters January 18, 2019.

Synopsis:

Following the conclusion of Split, Glass finds Dunn pursuing Crumb’s superhuman figure of The Beast in a series of escalating encounters, while the shadowy presence of Price emerges as an orchestrator who holds secrets critical to both men.

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Short Film: Tony Morales’ Hada Will Creep You Out

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Here at Dread Central, we are always on the lookout to peep and share cool new horror shorts from around the web. Case in point, director Tony Morales’ Hada.

The short film was selected for 260 festivals and received 50 awards, and you can now check it out in its entirety below.

I watched it this past weekend and there were more than a few shots contained within that chilled my bones. All about those feet moving up onto the bed. Brr. That’s all I’ll say.

Actually, I’ll say a (tiny) bit more: Someone needs to give Morales a shot at one of the new Conjuring-universe films. I think he’d knock it out of the park.

Watch the flick and you’ll see what I mean.

Again, you can check out the short below and then after giving the film a viewing, make sure to hit us up and let us know what you think in the comments below!

You can become a fan of the short film on Facebook HERE.

Synopsis:

Tonight Hada comes to visit Daniel because his last child tooth has fallen out. What Daniel doesn´t expect is that his worst enemy is the light.

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