Quentin Tarantino Insults David Lynch as “Up his own a**” for This Streaming Thriller

Quentin Tarantino
DEATH PROOF, (Quentin Tarantino segment from GRINDHOUSE), Quentin Tarantino, 2007. ©Weinstein Company LLC/Courtesy Everett Collection

In addition to churning out a steady stream of critically acclaimed features, Quentin Tarantino also finds time to recommend (and disparage) the work of other creators. We’ve brought you plenty of recommendations from the Pulp Fiction director in the past. But today, we have a spicy take to mix things up a bit.

A while back, Tarantino spoke with LA Weekly about his career trajectory and working within the studio system. The director used the opportunity to speak to creators whose work he thinks has suffered as a result of becoming insulated or working too closely with major distributors.

“I’m not ragging on other people, but after I saw Twin Peaks: Fire Walk With Me at Cannes, David Lynch has disappeared so far up his own ass that I have no desire to see another David Lynch movie until I hear something different,” Tarantino said. “And you know, I loved him. I loved him.”

Yikes. Those are some rather harsh words directed at a celebrated creator. I know the film was divisive, but I’m not sure I’d say it’s self-indulgent. At any rate, this rant is fairly tame by comparison to what Tarantino said about Kubrick a while back.

In case you’re unfamiliar with the film, the setup goes like this:

In the folksy town of Deerfield, Washington, FBI Agent Desmond (Chris Isaak) inexplicably disappears while hunting for the man who murdered a teen girl. The killer is never apprehended, and, after experiencing dark visions and supernatural encounters, Agent Dale Cooper (Kyle MacLachlan) chillingly predicts that the culprit will claim another life. Meanwhile, in the similarly cozy town of Twin Peaks, hedonistic beauty Lara Palmer (Sheryl Lee) hangs with lowlifes and seems destined for a grisly fate.

The film is a prequel to Lynch’s successful series Twin Peaks, which he created with Mark Frost. The series ran for two seasons in 1990 and 1991, with a third and final season premiering in 2017. Watching Fire Walk With Me after two seasons of the uncanny, the absurd, and the melodramatic puts a darker cloud over the series as Lynch and Frost reveal the tragedy of Laura Palmer.

You can stream Hulholland Drive right now via Showtime and The Criterion Channel.

That’s all we have for you for the time being. Stay tuned to the site for more hot takes as we uncover them. Also, be sure to follow @DreadCentral on Twitter so you never miss an important update.

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