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Amazing New Comic Inspired Troll Hunter One-Sheet

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We are completely convinced that it is impossible for something having to do with Troll Hunter to not kick a copious amount of ass. Case in point: this new comic inspired piece of artwork that we fully expect to become wallpaper everywhere.

Andre Ovredal’s highly anticipated film will be arriving on VOD May 6, 2011, with a limited theatrical run beginning on June 10. Locations are listed below.

Shot in a vérité style, Troll Hunter (review here) is the story of a group of Norwegian film students that set out to capture real-life trolls on camera after learning their existence has been covered up for years by a government conspiracy. A thrilling and wildly entertaining film, Troll Hunter delivers truly fantastic images of giant trolls wreaking havoc on the countryside, with darkly funny adherence to the original Norwegian folklore.

6/10/2011
New York, NY: Village East Cinemas

6/17/2011
Berkeley, CA: Shattuck Cinemas 10
San Francisco, CA: Lumiere Theatre 3
Santa Cruz, CA: Nickelodeon Theatres

6/24/2011
West Los Angeles, CA: Nuart Theatre
New Haven, CT: Criterion Cinemas 7
Cambridge, MA: Kendall Square Cinema
Albuquerque, NM: Guild

6/30/2011
Dormont, PA: Hollywood Theatre

7/1/2011
Denver, CO: Mayan Theatre
Hartford, CT: Real Art Ways Cinema
Washington, DC: E Street Cinema
Atlanta, GA: Midtown Art Cinemas 8
Minneapolis, MN: Lagoon Cinema
University City, MO: Tivoli Theatre
Omaha, NE: Dundee (Art)
Philadelphia, PA: Ritz at the Bourse

7/2/2011
Columbus, OH: Gateway 8

7/8/2011
Asheville, NC: Carolina Asheville 14

8/12/2011
Salem, MA: Cinema Salem 3

Amazing New Comic Inspired Troll Hunter One-Sheet (click for larger image)

VISIT THE EVILSHOP @ AMAZON!
Got news? Click here to submit it!
Hunt trolls in the comments section below.

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Exclusive: How’d You Lose a Body, FERAL?

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Coming this Friday to select theaters and VOD platforms is IFC Midnight’s zombie horror film Feral, which follows a group of friends in the woods who, one by one, begin turning into zombies after a disease rampages through their ranks. We’ve got our hands on a clip from the film, which features Scout Taylor-Compton and Lew Temple looking over the site of a grisly mess of viscera wondering what happened and where the body could have gone.

Your best friend has just been infected with a horrifying virus that will soon turn her into a rabid, rampaging cannibal-zombie. Do you: a) try to save her? or b) kill her before she kills you? That’s the nightmarish scenario six students find themselves facing when their celebratory camping trip goes terrifyingly wrong. One by one, each falls victim to the “feral” disease, until only Alice and Jules — two girlfriends testing the waters of their new relationship — are left standing, armed with a shotgun and holed up in a remote cabin. They’ve got a hell of a fight before them if they hope to survive…

Written by Adam Frazier and directed by Mark H. Young, Feral stars Scout Taylor-Compton, Olivia Luccardi, Lew Temple, Renee Olstead, Brock Kelly, Landry Allbright, and George Finn.

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Exclusive: Move Over Winchester, It’s Time For HINSDALE HOUSE to Shine

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We got some rather interesting news as we’ve been told that Steve Stanulis (Clinton Road) will be writing and directing Hinsdale House, a supernatural horror film about making a horror film within the house itself. The film will be produced by Maurice DiVirgilio and Frank Mandarino and it’s slated to begin shooting later this summer.

The way we’re told, the film follows a director who brings his cast to the Hinsdale House, telling them that they are not allowed to bring their cellphones so that they can get a better feel for the environment. While there, things start to go terribly wrong. The film is being pitched as Cloverfield meets Blair Witch meets Paranormal Activity.

Stanulis tells Dread Central, “My wife is a big fan of Ghost Adventures and we happen to catch an episode on television that explored the Hinsdale House. Nobody could stay in the house for more than 2 hours. It was intriguing. After doing some research and calling the actual home’s owner and finding out that even he doesn’t go anywhere near it, I just knew I had to do an on-location film about it. Nothing about the house had been done before in regards to a feature film and, as a filmmaker, that is super exciting. And I just know the actors will really be on edge while filming this, which will only make it even better.

The Hinsdale House, which is in Hinsdale, New York, gained notoriety after the book Echoes of a Haunting was published and detailed the paranormal events witnessed and experienced by Clara and Phil Dandy, along with their children in the early 1970’s. Supposedly they had a priest perform multiple exorcisms at the house but to no avail as the family was forced to move out. Both Discovery Channel and TLC aired episodes about the house.

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Editorials

5 Zombie Films That Flipped The Script

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The undead have long been a source of horror for cultures around the world. The thought of our loved ones returning from beyond the grave as shells of their former selves has filled countless people with feelings of dread, grief, and terror. Then there’s that whole pesky “they want to eat our flesh” thing going on. As if being in mourning wasn’t enough, now I’ve got to worry about remaining intact?

Netflix’s upcoming horror/thriller Cargo stars Martin Freeman as a man who wanders the Australian outback with 48 hours to live after being bitten by a zombie. The twist in this story is that Freeman has his one-year-old daughter with him and he needs to find a safe place for her before he turns.

Having seen the film, I can tell you that it’s pretty damn fantastic. The zombies are distinct enough that you’ll feel like you’re watching something new and the themes hinted at through the story, while not entirely unique, are so rarely touched upon in zombie films that it feels like a fascinating experience. Cargo has no issues bravely facing racism, xenophobia, environmental concerns, and the fear of loss, not only of one’s life but of all that will never be experienced. It’s horror with heart and it never shies away from that, for which I applaud it.

Because of the release of Cargo, we decided to take a look at five other zombie films that brought something new and exciting to the table.

Stranded in rural Australia in the aftermath of a violent pandemic, an infected father desperately searches for a new home for his infant child and a means to protect her from his own changing nature.

Cargo was directed by Ben Howling and Yolanda Ramke from a script written by Ramke. It stars Martin Freeman, Anthony Hayes, Susie Porter, Caren Pistorius, Kris McQuade, Simone Landers, and David Gulpilil.


Night of the Living Dead (1968)

It may not seem all that original now but George A. Romero’s 1968 classic really was revolutionary upon its release. Prior to this film, zombies were mostly thought of in terms of the Haitian folklore that was seen in movies like White Zombie. In that film, zombies weren’t mindless ghouls intent on devouring the living, they were freshly dead corpses resurrected by a Bokor (a necromancer) who wiped the mind of the zombie and made them their personal slave. Romero changed all that by taking the same concept and removing all possibility of the ghouls being controlled. Rather, they became the shuffling corpses that are now cultural icons.


Train to Busan (2016)

South Korea’s 2016 zombie film received, rightfully so, wild critical acclaim and the love of horror fans across the globe. Wasting no time in getting into the action, Train to Busan felt like a breath of fresh air because it masterfully blended humor, over-the-top action, horror, social commentary, and genuine emotion. Elements of each of these traits have been seen countless times throughout zombie films but the culmination of everything made Yeon Sang-ho’s film one of the best entries in the genre in this decade, possibly this century.


28 Days Later (2002)

Raw, gritty, vicious, and undeniably beautiful, 28 Days Later is a masterpiece of intensity and emotion. The first zombie film in many years to truly make it feel like the world was over, it created a believable story and focused on interesting, nuanced characters. As with Train to Busan and Night of the Living Dead themes of class warfare and social commentary were most certainly present, creating a film that felt fresh and exciting. There’s a reason 28 Days Later was credited with revitalizing the zombie genre and it’s because it brought new, albeit infected, blood into the mix.


Maggie (2015)

Seeing Arnold Schwarzenegger in a dramatic role bereft of action or comedy should already clue you in that this movie is aiming to do something different but it’s the actual meat (no pun intended) and potatoes of the story that offers a fresh perspective on zombies. Schwarzenegger’s Wade is distraught and desperate after learning that his daughter Maggie (Abigail Breslin) is infected with the “Necroambulist virus” and has days left before she changes into a cannibalistic creature. Rather than focus on the terrors of what might be, Maggie opts to focus on what we know will be lost. Maggie will never know what an adult life will be life. She will never know a love that lasts the rest of her life nor will she have the chance to be a parent. Her grief at what she will never experience is matched by Wade’s overwhelming anguish that he cannot protect his daughter or be there for all those moments that could have been.

As King Theoden mournfully stated in The Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers, “No parent should have to bury their child.”


The Girl With All The Gifts (2016)

What if the zombie was actually the character we, the audience, were pushed to care the most about? Enter Colm McCarthy’s 2016 brilliant film The Girl With All The Gifts and you’ll have that same experience. Never failing to bring scares, the film also isn’t afraid to ask how can we love that which can put us in so much danger as well as cause us so much pain? Sennia Nanua positively shines as Melanie, a young girl infected with a fungal disease that will send her on a mindless, flesh-hungry rampage were it not for a cream that remaining humans can rub on their arms to curb her appetite. As with 28 Days Later, The Girl With All The Gifts doesn’t shy away from commentary on race and class differences. But its true strength lies in its ability to make you feel for the very thing that should strike fear into your heart.


This post was sponsored by Netflix.

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