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Two New Behind-the-Scenes Clips: Let Me In





With the Blu-ray and DVD release of Let Me In (Blu-ray / DVD review here) quickly approaching, we nabbed a couple of behind-the-scenes clips for you guys to dig on to get you all sweaty with anticipation! Dig it!

From the Press Release
A bullied young boy befriends a young female vampire in the thriller Let Me In, available on Blu-ray™ and DVD on February 1st, 2011 from Anchor Bay Entertainment. Written and directed by filmmaker Matt Reeves (Cloverfield), Let Me In is based on the best-selling Swedish novel Låt den Rätte Komma In (Let the Right One In) by John Ajvide Lindqvist and the highly acclaimed film of the same name. The film’s score is by Oscar®-, Emmy®- and Grammy®-winning composer Michael Giacchino (Up, “Lost”).

Starring Kodi Smit-McPhee (The Road), Chloë Grace Moretz (Kick-Ass), Elias Koteas (Shutter Island), Cara Buono (“The Sopranos”), and Oscar® nominee Richard Jenkins (The Visitor), Let Me In is a poignant coming-of-age story as well as a bone-chilling horror film. In a pop-culture landscape littered with the bloodthirsty undead, the 2010 release from Overture Films of Let Me In stands out as a very different kind of vampire movie – a haunting meditation on the difficult and often painful transition into adolescence. SRP is $39.99 for the Blu-ray™ and $29.98 for the DVD.

Genre fans and DVD aficionados will be thrilled with the generous amount of bonus features on the Let Me In Blu-ray™ and DVD, including the much-talked-about visual effects piece, “Car Crash Sequence Step-By-Step”, with commentary from director Matt Reeves; “From The Inside: A Look at the Making of Let Me In”; “The Art of Special Effects”; Unrated Deleted Scenes; Trailer Gallery: Greenband Trailer, Redband Trailer; and a Poster and Still Gallery. The Blu-ray™ edition also includes the Blu-ray™ exclusive: “Dissecting Let Me In”, as well as a digital copy of the film. And if that wasn’t enough, both editions include a Let Me In comic book with an exclusive cover designed by award-winning comic book artist Sean Phillips. A graphic novel will be released next year.

In bleak New Mexico a lonely, bullied boy, Owen (Kodi Smit-McPhee), forms a unique bond with his mysterious new neighbor, Abby (Chloë Grace Moretz), who moves from town to town with the man who appears to be her father (Richard Jenkins). Trapped in the mind and body of a child, however, Abby is forced to hide a horrific secret of bloodthirsty survival. But in a world of both tenderness and terror, how can you invite in the one friend who may unleash the ultimate nightmare?

Based on the Swedish novel, Let the Right One In, “Let Me In is a dark and violent love story, a beautiful piece of cinema, and a respectful rendering of my novel, for which I am grateful,” says the book’s author, John Ajvide Lindqvist.

Let Me in - Clip 1: Oh It's Me
Uploaded by dreadcentral. - Watch feature films and entire TV shows.


Let Me In - Clip 2: Bullying
Uploaded by dreadcentral. - Watch feature films and entire TV shows.

Two New Behind-the-Scenes Clips: Let Me In

- Uncle Creepy

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Mephistopheles's picture

I love how they're still trying to pass this off as a new take on the novel when Reeves was clearly using the Alfredson film as his blueprint. Who are they trying to kid?


Submitted by Mephistopheles on Sat, 01/29/2011 - 2:52am.
Terminal's picture

It's a very flat conventional reworking for a very safe audience.
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"We are bad guys. That means we've got more to do other than bullying companies. It's fun to lead a bad man's life."


Submitted by Terminal on Sat, 01/29/2011 - 1:28am.
Vanvance1's picture

Finally saw this and while it is well done it doesn't compare to the subtle artistry of 'Let The Right One In'. So even though this is not a train wreck of any kind it is simply a less fully realized version of the story and has no real reason to exist.

Trust Hollywood to once again pull a movie's teeth. Sexuality is especially scary to North Americans.


Submitted by Vanvance1 on Sat, 01/29/2011 - 12:27am.
Terminal's picture

It really is. Sex scares them, so they turned it in to a Twilight film.
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"We are bad guys. That means we've got more to do other than bullying companies. It's fun to lead a bad man's life."


Submitted by Terminal on Sat, 01/29/2011 - 11:35pm.

All the sexual weirdness is there save for the crotch shot, which didn't even serve much of a purpose in the original.

And Let Me In wasn't a Hollywood film, it was an independent British-American co-production with Hammer Films.


Submitted by MouthForWar on Sat, 01/29/2011 - 12:48pm.
Terminal's picture

It was independently financed but not an indie film. It's as much an indie production as The Kids are All Right or The King's Speech. It's faux-indie gloss on an abysmal remake.
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"We are bad guys. That means we've got more to do other than bullying companies. It's fun to lead a bad man's life."


Submitted by Terminal on Sat, 01/29/2011 - 11:35pm.

"Independently financed" is the definition of an independent film. Independent = made outside of a studio system... which this movie was.

They turned this into a Twilight film? REALLY?! That comment only proves that either A. You didn't see it, B. You don't know what Twilight is, or C. You're just being a troll. This movie is SO true to the original, that to call THIS version a "Twilight film," is basically to call the original movie one as well. Taking out a crotch shot that was needless to begin with is making it a Twilight film? Wow, dude. Just, wow. Hyperbole, much?

A Nightmare on Elm Street is an abysmal remake. I fail to see how Let Me In compares on even the most basic levels (such as acting, editing, cinematography, etc.) Even the author of the book called it a beautiful retelling of his novel, even better than the Swedish version in some areas. If this was the movie that came out of Sweden a couple years ago, people would be all over it. The hate stems from the fact that its a remake of a foreign film, pure and simple. Not only that, its a very FAITHFUL remake that didn't change much at all other than some of the tone being a bit bleaker and tightening up certain aspects of the story. Even the creator of the story thought it was good, and I'll gladly be one to agree with him.

If a remake is too faithful, people bitch. If a remake is too different, people bitch. If a remake walks the balance between the two, people bitch. Basically, if a remake exists, people bitch.

Sorry it wasn't as good of a remake as the Wolf Man. Now THAT'S a "safe" and "shallow" remake for you.


Submitted by MouthForWar on Sun, 01/30/2011 - 4:29am.
Terminal's picture

Actually no on just about everything you said. Independently financed doesn't always equate independent film. Hammer is a boutique studio, which doesn't mean it's an indie studio, it's merely a smaller studio for more peg holed films. "Let Me In" was as much an independent film as "Grindhouse" was.
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"We are bad guys. That means we've got more to do other than bullying companies. It's fun to lead a bad man's life."


Submitted by Terminal on Sun, 01/30/2011 - 5:42am.

It still qualifies. Anything made outside of the major studio system is considered an independent film. Now you're just boiling it down to semantics.

"An independent film, or indie film, is a film that is produced mostly outside of a major film studio." Key words "MAJOR FILM STUDIO," which Hammer is not.

http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&safe=off&client=firefox-a&hs=FBW&rls=...


Submitted by MouthForWar on Sun, 01/30/2011 - 7:25am.
Terminal's picture

Whatever you say man. You win. It's an independent movie. It was made for three thousand dollars out of someone's basement. You win.
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"We are bad guys. That means we've got more to do other than bullying companies. It's fun to lead a bad man's life."


Submitted by Terminal on Sun, 01/30/2011 - 2:08pm.
Gareth Jones's picture

Almost exactly how I felt about it. While it didn't upset or offend me in terms of remakes (I thought it was a very faithful and thoughtful one. The car crash scene alone was almost enough to sell me), I felt that it missed a decent number of the emotional nuances of the original. Very close, but the original beats it.


Submitted by Gareth Jones on Sat, 01/29/2011 - 12:30am.

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