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Narrators Announced for Full Dark, No Stars Audio Version; Read an Excerpt Now





Narrators Announced for Full Dark, No Stars Audio Version; Read an Excerpt NowIn this era of the Kindle and similar devices, it'll be interesting to see how the audio book fares, but considering the talent that's signed on to narrate Stephen King's upcoming Full Dark, No Stars, odds are it's here to stay. Who are we talking about? Read on for the details.

According to the home of all things King related, Lilja's Library, Simon & Schuster has announced the narrators for the audio edition of Full Dark, No Stars are Craig Wasson (A Nightmare on Elm Street 3: Dream Warriors), who was also the narrator of King's Blockade Billy, and Jessica Hecht (soon to appear in Wes Craven's My Soul to Take).

You can pre-order Full Dark, No Stars from the EvilShop below, and as a reminder, here are the four stories contained in the book, which is being released November 9th. A portion of an excerpt from "A Good Marriage" follows the synopses. For the whole thing click here for Simon & Schuster's website.

  • "1922" - The story opens with the confession of Wilfred James to the murder of his wife, Arlette, following their move to Hemingford, Nebraska, onto land willed to Arlette by her father.
  • "Big Driver" - Mystery writer Tess has been supplementing her writing income for years by doing speaking engagements with no problems. But following a last-minute invitation to a book club 60 miles away, she takes a shortcut home with dire consequences.
  • "Fair Extension" - Harry Streeter, who is suffering from cancer, decides to make a deal with the devil, but as always, there is a price to pay.
  • "A Good Marriage" - Darcy Anderson learns more about her husband of over twenty years than she would have liked to know when she stumbles literally upon a box under a worktable in their garage.

  • From "A Good Marriage" in Full Dark, No Stars:

    The one thing nobody asked in casual conversation, Darcy thought in the days after she found what she found in the garage, was this: How's your marriage? They asked how was your weekend and how was your trip to Florida and how's your health and how are the kids; they even asked how's life been treatin you, hon? But nobody asked how's your marriage?

    Good, she would have answered the question before that night. Everything's fine.

    She had been born Darcellen Madsen (Darcellen, a name only parents besotted with a freshly purchased book of baby names could love), in the year John F. Kennedy was elected President. She was raised in Freeport, Maine, back when it was a town instead of an adjunct to L.L.Bean, America's first superstore, and half a dozen other oversized retail operations of the sort that are called "outlets" (as if they were sewer drains rather than shopping locations). She went to Freeport High School, and then to Addison Business School, where she learned secretarial skills. She was hired by Joe Ransome Chevrolet, which by 1984, when she left the company, was the largest car dealership in Portland. She was plain, but with the help of two marginally more sophisticated girlfriends, learned enough makeup skills to make herself pretty on workdays and downright eye-catching on Friday and Saturday nights, when a bunch of them liked to go out for margaritas at The Lighthouse or Mexican Mike's (where there was live music).

    In 1982, Joe Ransome hired a Portland accounting firm to help him figure out his tax situation, which had become complicated ("The kind of problem you want to have," Darcy overheard him tell one of the senior salesmen). A pair of briefcase-toting men came out, one old and one young. Both wore glasses and conservative suits; both combed their short hair neatly away from their foreheads in a way that made Darcy think of the photographs in her mother's MEMORIES OF '54 senior yearbook, the one with the image of a boy cheerleader holding a megaphone to his mouth stamped on its faux-leather cover. The younger accountant was Bob Anderson. She got talking with him on their second day at the dealership, and in the course of their conversation, asked him if he had any hobbies. Yes, he said, he was a numismatist.

    He started to tell her what that was and she said, "I know. My father collects Lady Liberty dimes and buffalo-head nickels. He says they're his numismatical hobby-horse. Do you have a hobby-horse, Mr. Anderson?"

    He did: wheat pennies. His greatest hope was to some day come across a 1955 double-date, which was—

    But she knew that, too. The '55 double-date was a mistake. A valuable mistake.

    Young Mr. Anderson, he of the thick and carefully combed brown hair, was delighted with this answer. He asked her to call him Bob. Later, during their lunch—which they took on a bench in the sunshine behind the body shop, a tuna on rye for him and a Greek salad in a Tupperware bowl for her—he asked if she would like to go with him on Saturday to a street sale in Castle Rock. He had just rented a new apartment, he said, and was looking for an armchair. Also a TV, if someone was selling a good one at a fair price. A good one at a fair price was a phrase with which she would grow comfortably familiar in the years to come.

    He was as plain as she was, just another guy you'd pass on the street without noticing, and would never have makeup to make him prettier . . . except that day on the bench, he did. His cheeks flushed when he asked her out, just enough to light him up a little and give him a glow.

    "No coin collections?" she teased.

    He smiled, revealing even teeth. Small teeth, nicely cared for, and white. It never occurred to her that the thought of those teeth could make her shudder—why would it?

    "If I saw a nice set of coins, of course I'd look," he said.

    "Especially wheat pennies?" Teasing, but just a little.

    "Especially those. Would you like to come, Darcy?"

    She came. And she came on their wedding night, too. Not terribly often after that, but now and then. Often enough to consider herself normal and fulfilled.

    In 1986, Bob got a promotion. He also (with Darcy's encouragement and help) started up a small mail-order business in collectible American coins. It was successful from the start, and in 1990, he added baseball trading cards and old movie memorabilia. He kept no stock of posters, one-sheets, or window cards, but when people queried him on such items, he could almost always find them. Actually it was Darcy who found them, using her overstuffed Rolodex in those pre-computer days to call collectors all over the country. The business never got big enough to become full-time, and that was all right. Neither of them wanted such a thing. They agreed on that as they did on the house they eventually bought in Pownal, and on the children when it came time to have them. They agreed. When they didn't agree, they compromised. But mostly they agreed. They saw eye-to-eye.

    How's your marriage?

    - Debi Moore

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