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Timecrimes Gets Remade Already







Timecrimes gets a remakeThere must be a bug in Hollywood to see and instantly remake any Spanish horror films for us stupid Americans. Cause you know how we hate subtitles. Variety got word that United Artists just scored the remake rights for Timecrimes, the Spanish horror film that debuted at Sundance on Friday night.

Magnolia has the rights to distribute the film here in the U.S. after it’s debut, so hopefully they’ll get it out there before the remake is done. Timecrimes is about a man who innocently wants to get a bit closer to a naked woman he sees sunbathing, but is instead attacked by a maniac and forced to take refuge in a nearby laboratory. He hides inside a peculiar device but when he emerges, he finds out it’s hours earlier. And that’s only the beginning of the man’s time-related troubles.

It is good to know, at least, that American Gangster writer Steve Zaillian is producing and will likely pen the remake's outline, since he's got some mad skills. And hell, I’ve not heard much about the original, save that the director made some really good shorts early in his career, so maybe this one will benefit from a redo. Gotta keep hope alive, right? Check out some stills and the trailer for the original below and keep it here for more on the remake front as it comes down the line!

Timecrimes gets a remake Timecrimes gets a remake

Timecrimes gets a remake Timecrimes gets a remake

Timecrimes gets a remake Timecrimes gets a remake

- Johnny Butane

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Chainsaw's picture

No, I hear what you're laying down, Canie. I haven't seen any movie walkouts personally, but any movie I've seen subtitled usually was a week or so after it opened, so the usual herd was already thinned out by then.

I've had people I work with and people who are my family actually say they wouldn't see a movie if there were subtitles in it, because they don't go to movies to read. Seriously.

If you wouldn't go to a movie because of that reasoning, then you shouldn't go to movies period.


Submitted by Chainsaw on Mon, 01/21/2008 - 8:22am.

I didn't mean to get offensive with my statement, but I guess that is my own fault for wording it the way I did. I'll give people Pan's Labyrinth, in terms of walkouts, because it was never made obvious at all in the trailers and TV spots that it was a foreign film. Not a single one of the US previews I say for it anywhere had any dialogue in it, so I blame the studio for that one. Not so for the others though. My point is, I guess, that it's silly to pay money to see what is obviously a film done in another language (be it foreign or domestic) and then walkout whining about having "to read". I worked at a theater as a projectionist for almost four years and had to hear it over and over again whenever we'd get one in. Same thing happened for The Passion of the Christ, but the church-going groups (be they supporting or against the film) kept the grosses up on that anyway. You wouldn't believe the amount of people that came in stating how they hoped Passion bombed and disappeared quickly...........yet had bought tickets for it themselves! It was ridiculous.

Anyway, I don't feel superior to someone for not liking subtitled films. I guess I just get too miffed sometimes when I'm watching one and I hear someone near me get up five minutes into it mumbling how they "didn't pay to read" and want their "money back". I think I'm actually just angry in general at America's overall lack of acceptance of subtitled cinema and the film studios that continue to perpetuate it day in and day out. It does seem to be getting better, but slowly. Years ago I'd be lucky if just one subtitled picture hit my area (outside of an occasional small film festival). Now we're probably getting between 5 and 10 a year, depending on how well the films are doing in the larger markets.

I love cinema and I guess it just gets to me that some people refuse to watch anything that isn't in English. Anyway, if I offended anyone with my statements, then I apologize. It was not my intention to do so and I should have chosen my words more carefully.


Submitted by Caine Is Able on Mon, 01/21/2008 - 1:09am.

I'll watch subtitles any day of the week, but why is it pathetic that some people DON'T go to the movies if there are subtitles?

I think it's pathetic to think that you're somehow superior to those people just because you're....um...cultured(?) enough to watch movies with subtitles.

Please explain how that makes you cultured, anyway?


Submitted by G.D. on Sun, 01/20/2008 - 11:30am.
Evil Alien's picture

what about Gibson's "The Passion of the Christ"? i guess if you put enough god, guts and glory in a film americans will work at the sub-title thing... ;)


Submitted by Evil Alien on Sun, 01/20/2008 - 10:57am.

That's the problem though, Johnny. Many American flat out REFUSE to watch a movie with subtitles, no matter what it is. When I saw "Pan's Labyrinth", half the audience walked out within the first 15 minutes after they realized the whole film was in another language. Same thing happened with "Curse of the Golden Flower", "Apocalypto", and "Letters from Iwo Jima". Is it sad? Yes. Is it pathetic? Most definitely. But it's true. Every un-dubbed foreign film that I have ever seen on the silver screen has had numerous walkouts. It's audience behavior that is causing a lot of these remakes of foreign films, more than anything. The uncultured jackasses are ruining it for the rest of us!


Submitted by Caine Is Able on Sun, 01/20/2008 - 4:05am.
Tsotha-lanti's picture

"There must be a bug in Hollywood to see and instantly remake any Spanish horror films for us stupid Americans. Cause you know how we hate subtitles."

Nah, I think any sociologist would have a total field day trying to find a deeper explanation for this. :D


Submitted by Tsotha-lanti on Sun, 01/20/2008 - 4:03am.
Evil Alien's picture

It's a vicious cycle that's set here in the states, Hollywood believes movie goers are illiterate, American movie goers get conditioned to being illiterate, Hollywood uses this as proof that they are right and continue to rip off the creative ideas of others under the guise they are translating. How about this Hollywood, I'm going to "translate" a movie to a DVD-R so that a friend can understand it.


Submitted by Evil Alien on Sat, 01/19/2008 - 1:40pm.

I saw this film at Fantastic Fest and it was AWESOME! I can't see a US remake being better than the original.


Submitted by Grusom on Sat, 01/19/2008 - 1:33pm.
Terminal's picture

I want to see the Spanish version. Sounds very original.

As for this remake, it's hilarious. I really think Americans would be more open to subtitles, if more movies with subtitles were in theaters open to more audiences.


Submitted by Terminal on Sat, 01/19/2008 - 12:23pm.

I was at a party with the guys who recently made the documentary on artist Moebius, they returned to SF after attending the TIFF with my friend to hang out and party a few days before returning to their homeland of Germany. And man all they could say was how great this film was. Their eyes got wide and they'd struggle to find the right adjectives to describe how good they thought it was. One of the simply held his arms up and said "FUCK YES!" hahaha.

Can't wait to see this. The Spanish version that is. I've been saying for close to three years that "Spain is the new Japan" as far as genre output. Better in my oinion actually because the SPanish films don't do the same fucking thing over and over and over and over and over.


Submitted by The Butcher on Sat, 01/19/2008 - 11:51am.

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