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Dracula: Prince of Darkness Blu-ray Art and Specs

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Dracula: Prince of Darkness Blu-ray Art and SpecsLooking forward to Dracula: Prince of Darkness hitting Blu-ray here in the States for the first time? Then get ready to read on as we have everything you need to know about the upcoming release right here!

From the Press Release
Millennium Entertainment is pleased to reveal the final artwork and announce details for its upcoming high-definition release of the classic 1966 Hammer film Dracula: Prince of Darkness on September 3rd. Directed by Terence Fisher and starring the iconic Christopher Lee, Barbara Shelley, and Andrew Keir, Millennium’s Collector’s Edition of Dracula: Prince of Darkness marks the first time that horror fans in the US will be able to enjoy the film on Blu-ray. Millennium is also planning to release several other Hammer Films on Blu-ray later this year including Quartermass and the Pit, The Plague of the Zombies, and The Devil Rides Out.

Special features for the Collector’s Edition Blu-Ray of Dracula: Prince of Darkness include an exclusive still gallery (never before released); audio commentary featuring Christopher Lee, Barbara Shelley, Suzan Farmer, and Francis Matthews; Super 8MM behind-the-scenes footage; a restored original trailer; “Back to Black,” a brand new documentary on Dracula: Prince of Darkness; and much more.

In this direct sequel to Hammer’s Dracula (1958), Christopher Lee returns for more blood as he encounters a group of stranded English tourists who are holidaying in the Carpathian Mountains. Despite receiving several warnings by the unconventional Father Sandor (Andrew Keir) along their travels to stay as far away from the Count’s castle as they can, the group end up stranded there, with their host set to be resurrected upon their arrival. Will the travelers survive their fateful meeting with Dracula: Prince of Darkness?

Special Features:

  • Audio commentary with Christopher Lee, Barbara Shelley, Suzan Farmer, and Francis Matthews
  • Exclusive still gallery (NEVER BEFORE RELEASED!)
  • Restored original trailer
  • Dracula: Prince of Darkness restoration comparison
  • Super 8MM behind-the-scenes footage
  • Brand new documentary “Back to Black”
  • World of Hammer Episode: “Hammer Stars: Christopher Lee”
  • Printed memorabilia perfect for every classic Hammer fan out there

    Dracula: Prince of Darkness

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    IFC Midnight Picks Up SXSW Hit What Keeps You Alive

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    Colin Minihan’s thriller What Keeps You Alive starring Hannah Emily Anderson and Brittany Allen premiered in the Midnighters section at SXSW last month and today we have word via Deadline that the film has been picked up by IFC Midnight.

    I’m very excited to be working with IFC Midnight on releasing What Keeps You Alive,” Minihan said in a statement. “They are at the top of their game and consistently releasing the best the genre has to offer.”

    An official release date for the film hasn’t been announced as of yet but we will make sure to pass along word once we hear it.

    Are you excited to check out Colin Minihan’s What Keeps You Alive? Make sure to hit us up and let us know what you think in the comments below or on Facebook, Twitter, and/or Instagram.

    The film is written and directed by Colin Minihan and based on a story by Minihan and Brittany Allen, who also composed the film’s score. Minihan also produces with Kurtis David Harder, Chris Ball, and Ben Knechtel. The film stars Emily Anderson, Brittany Allen, Martha MacIsaac and Joey Klein.

    Synopsis:

    A same-sex couple against one another on their one-year anniversary.

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    Blumhouse’s Stephanie Starring Frank Grillo Dumped to DVD

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    Blumhouse’s new kid-horror flick Stephanie starring Frank Grillo and Anna Torv is getting dumped to DVD (yep, not even a Blu-ray) without a single special feature May 1.

    And to make matters worse, today we have the film’s “trailer”… which is actually only a clip. Wow.

    You can check out the clip below and the movie’s DVD cover art to the right and then make sure to let us know what you think in the comments below or on Facebook, Twitter, and/or Instagram!

    The film is directed by Akiva Goldsman from a screenplay written by Ben Collins and Luke Piotrowski (Siren, Super Dark Times) and stars Frank Grillo and Anna Torv. It hits DVD May 1.

    BUY IT HERE

    Synopsis:

    A young girl, Stephanie is abandoned by her parents and forced to survive on her own. When her parents return, they are surprised to find her alive after they discover dark, supernatural forces are wreaking havoc, with Stephanie at the center of the turmoil.

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    Tribeca 2018: The Dark Review – Atmospheric Zombie Horror Done Different

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    Starring Nadia Alexander, Toby Nichols

    Written by Justin P. Lange

    Directed by Justin P. Lange


    The zombie subgenre often goes through waves where it focuses on one aspect that changes the status quo before overdoing it completely. Romero’s slow shuffling zombies were the norm until we got fast moving zombies with Return of the Living Dead and 28 Days Later. There was even a period where we had smarter zombies, like in Fido and Warm Bodies. Now it seems like we’re about to enter an era where the undead are meant to elicit emotion, making us feel for those who have no feelings themselves. Such is the case with Justin P. Lange’s The Dark.

    The film follows Mina (Alexander), a young woman who was murdered and stalks the forest that saw her demise. Anytime some unfortunate soul enters her area, they are quickly dispatched and become her feast. But when she stumbles across a young boy named Alex (Nichols) in the back of a car who shows signs of clear and horrifying abuse, she can’t bring herself to do away with him. Rather, she becomes his protector while trying to protect her own little world. As police and locals search for Alex to help bring him home, their own growing relationship seems to be changing Mina in ways she never thought possible.

    Stylishly shot by cinematographer Klemens Hufnagl (The Eremites, Macondo), The Dark lives and breathes along with the forest in which it spends the majority of its time. The film feels very natural, as though no artificial lighting was used and we are brought into the world in which these characters live. Steel blue washes over the screen as dusk turns into night while light and dark contrast during the day. The only visuals that didn’t play well were Mina’s undead look and Alex’s scarred eyes, which were both distracting but possible to be overlooked.

    Both Alexander and Nichols performed well enough, although the film spent too much time on the first two acts of their story, their combative phase and then the period where they build trust, leaving them scrambling at the end to show that they not only trust but are reliant upon each other. Alex finds trust in Mina after his horrific ordeal while Mina’s choice to protect and guide him sees her humanity slowly coming back.

    Where the film goes awry is that it doesn’t know how to convey its message. We learn that Mina’s death was the result of a sexual assault by her mother’s boyfriend, who can barely look Mina in the eyes, turns violent. Alex’s captor is also a man of violence but that’s mixed with weakness and timidity. This is a theme throughout the movie, where the adults are wicked and/or self-serving and it’s only these teenagers, who certainly have endured a fair share of suffering, can be seen as worthy of empathy and understanding.

    Also present and enough to stay in the back of my mind while watching The Dark were the strange and inconsistent ways it handled time. We learn that Mina’s death was several years, possibly more than a decade, prior to where we see her now. But when presented with an iPhone, she first doesn’t know that it has a history of previously made calls and then, without anyone explaining it, she knows exactly how to use it. Meanwhile, Alex’s scars on his eyes, which the movie hints were done by his kidnapper, suggest that he’s been held captive for months if not longer but the the opening of the movie suggests that it’s been a few weeks, at most. While not overly distracting, these are certainly issues that pop out.

    These faults aside, The Dark is still effective and emotionally charged. With enough kills to satisfy the bloodthirsty, it will certainly have an audience who love films about the undead but are craving something with a different taste.

    • The Dark
    3.0

    Summary

    Poignant and original, The Dark is not without its flaws. But it sure does know that horror doesn’t have to be solely of the flesh. It can just as easily be horror of the heart.

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