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Anchor Bay Fright Pack: Man’s Worst Friends

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If there is one DVD company out there that we as horror fans can call our own, it’s Anchor Bay Entertainment! So much goodness! So many memories! They’ve taken horror on DVD to so many new levels you really have to wonder, “What the hell will they think of next?”

A few months ago they came out with a new addition to their ever-growing DVD line: The Fright Pack. The coolest thing about this idea besides the bad ass artwork and packaging is the value of it! You get six, that’s right six, feature films, extras and all, for about the price of one loaded special edition DVD.

Let’s take a look at this latest collection of horrific goodness:

Fright Pack: Man’s Worst Friends

This time up they have included a bevy of films that focus on every good thing in a man’s life that can go horribly awry, starting with the ever faithful pooch. Hey, even famous movie monsters need a little companionship. Just look at Paris Hilton and her chihuahua. Or better yet, don’t. Lord knows we’ve seen enough of her. What I’m talking about here is none other than Zoltan: Hound of Dracula! Spend five seconds with this devil dog, and you can plainly see that the Big D ain’t the only one in the family with some bite.

Next up we have another kind of four-legged critter, Bruno Hell of the Living Dead Mattei’s Rats: Night of Terror. Wow, where to begin with this one? It’s absolutely one of the single most unintentionally funny films ever made. If you’re at all familiar with Mattei’s work, then you can imagine what I’m talking about here. The ending of this film alone makes it worth having. I freeze framed it for 45 minutes and cackled like a madman! Bad movie, but good times!

Italian gore maestro Dario Argento’s Cat o’Nine Tails is next up on the menu. If there’s one thing you can always count on in an Argento film, it’s that it is going to look pretty and have some really brutal murders strewn throughout its run-time. Cat o’Nine Tails delivers all of the good looking gory goodies that we expect from the living legend and piles on the suspense in spades.

Then we have an offering from one of my personal favorite directors, Lucio Fulci. In his take on Edgar Allen Poe’s The Black Cat, we find all of the ingredients of what you’d expect from a Fulci film perfectly intact — Flagrant gore splashed across the screen with sheer reckless abandon. Lucio, your legacy bleeds on, my friend! God bless ya!

There are plenty of creatures on this planet that serve to make mankind’s stay here a pleasant one. Every animal seems to have a purpose. From bees making honey to cows giving milk. Even the lowly slug has an important role. They … well, they … Aww, who am I kidding? These friggin’ nasty little mucus covered monsters are the grossest thing on the entire planet! They seemingly serve no purpose other than to skeeve anyone within two feet of them out! They do a lot more than that though in the little seen nature-run-amok epic(!) Slugs. In it, the little slimy bastards not only look sickening but now they have teeth, and mankind is on the menu. Without question, Slugs is one of the most disgusting films of its time. Only to be viewed on an empty stomach.

After losing your lunch while watching Slugs, you’re gonna need to stare at a creature a little easier on the eyes. Who better than an 18-year-old Demi Moore making her acting debut in Parasite?!? For those old enough to remember, Parasite was originally released to theatres in 3-D. How I wish this effect could be translated the right way for home viewing. It’d make a helluva DVD extra. Anyway, even all these years later Demi’s still out there fighting parasites. Sadly, the dreaded Kutcher Strain™ seems to have finally gotten her number. Hang in there, Demi. We’re all rootin’ for ya!

So there you have it! Quite the package if I do say so myself. A Fulci and an Argento film in the same collection. Blood and gore to spare. Starlets in peril. An ending so funny it has to be seen to be believed. The only things missing are a a few friends and a pizza. Hold the anchovies though; they look too much like those damned slugs for my liking!

Fright Pack: Man’s Worst Friends
Zoltan: Hound of Dracula (1978)
Rats: Night of Terror (1984)
Cat o’Nine Tails (1971)
The Black Cat (1981)
Slugs (1988)
Parasite (1982)


4 out of 5

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Interview: Director Jeff Burr Revisits Leatherface: The Texas Chainsaw Massacre III

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Director Jeff Burr was gracious enough to give us here at Dread Central a few minutes of his time to discuss the Blu-ray release of his 1990 film Leatherface: The Texas Chainsaw Massacre III. Recently dropped on 2/13, the movie has undergone the white-glove treatment, and he was all-too-happy to bring us back to when the film was being shot…and eventually diced thanks to the MPAA – so settle in, grab a cold slice of bloody meat, read on and enjoy!

DC: First off – congrats on seeing the film get the treatment it deserves on Blu-ray – you excited about it?

JB: Yeah, I’m really happy that it’s coming out on Blu-ray, especially since so many people bitch and moan about the death of physical media, and this thing made the cut, and it’s great for people to be able to see probably the best-looking version of it since we saw it in the lab back in 1989.

DC: Take us back to when you’d first gotten the news that you were tabbed to be the man to direct the third installment in this franchise – what was your first order of business?

JB: It was fairly condensed pre-production for me, and there really wasn’t a whole lot of time to think about the import or the greatness of it – it was basically just roll up your sleeves and go. It was a bit disappointing because a lot of times in pre-production you have the opportunity to dream what could be – casting had already been done, but certain decisions hadn’t been made yet. A very condensed pre-production, but exciting as hell, for sure! (laughs)

DC: R.A. Mihailoff in the role of Leatherface – was it the decision from the get-go to have him play the lead role?

JB: No – I totally had someone else in mind, even though R.A. had done a role in my student film about 7 years earlier, and we’d kept in touch, and I’d felt strongly because I’d gotten to know him a bit that Gunnar Hansen should have come back and played Leatherface, which would have given a bit more legitimacy to this third movie. He and I talked, and he had some issues with the direction that it was going – he really wanted to be involved, and it ended up boiling down to a financial thing, and it wasn’t outrageous at all – it wasn’t like he asked for the moon, but the problem was that New Line refused to pay it, categorically. I think the line producer at the time was more adamant about it than anyone, and Mike DeLuca was one of the executives on the movie, and he was really the guy that was running this, in a creative sense. I made my case for Gunner to both he and the line producer, and they flat out refused to pay him what he was asking, so after that was a done “no deal” I decided that R.A would be the right guy to step into the role. Since New Line was the arbiter of the film, he had to come in and audition for the part, and he impressed everyone and got the part. He did an absolutely fantastic job – such a joy to work with, and he was completely enthusiastic about everything.

DC: Let’s talk about Viggo Mortenson, and with this being one of his earliest roles – did you know you had something special with this guy on your set?

JB: Here’s the thing – you knew he was talented, and I’d seen him in the movie Prison way back in the early stages of development and was very impressed with him, and he was one of those guys that I think we were really lucky to get him on board with us. I really believe that The Indian Runner with he and directed by Sean Penn was the movie that truly made people stand up and notice his work. Every person in this cast was one hundred percent into this film and jumped in no questions asked when it was time to roll around in the body pits.

DC: It’s no secret about the amount of shit that the MPAA put you through in order to get this film released – can you expound on that for a minute?

JB: At the time, I believe it was a record amount of times we had to go back to the MPAA after re-cutting the film – I think it was 11 times that we went back. What a lot of people don’t realize is after Bob Shaye (President of New Line) had come into the editing room and he thought that it was very disturbing, and cut out some stuff himself. He thought that it would have been banned in every country, and it was banned in a lot of countries but so were the previous two. It was definitely on the verge of being emasculated before even being submitted to the MPAA, and I would have thought just a few adjustments here and there – maybe a couple of times to go back…but eleven? It was front-page news in the trade papers then, and I think that the overall tone of the film was looked at as being nasty. The previous film (Chainsaw 2) had actually gone out unrated, and with the first film being so notorious, I think it was a combination of all of that, and now even the most unrated version of this would be rated R – that’s how far the pendulum has swung in the other direction.

DC: Looking back at the film after all this time – what would be one thing that you’d change about the movie?

JB: Oh god – any film director worth his salt would look back at any of their films and want to change stuff up, and with this being 28 years old, I can look back and say “oh yeah, I’d change this, this and this!” You grow and learn over the course of your time directing, and this was my third movie and my first without producers that I had known, so the main thing that I’d do today would be to make it a bit more politically savvy. I had always thought that they wanted me to put my vision on this film, and that wasn’t necessarily the case, so maybe I’d navigate those political waters a little better.

DC: Last thing, Jeff – what’s keeping you busy these days? Any projects to speak of?

JB: Oh yeah, I’ve got a couple of movies that I’m working on – I’m prepping a horror movie right now, and then I’ve got a comedy film that I’m doing after that. You haven’t heard the last of me! I’ve had a real up and down (mostly down) career, but I still love it – it’s what I love to do, and it’s still great that after 28 years people still want to talk about this movie, and are still watching it – that’s the greatest gift you can get, and I thank everyone that’s seen it and talked about it over all these years.

BUY IT NOW!

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Werewolf Short Werehouse Coming this Halloween

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Director Daniel Mark Young, whom you may remember for the horror shorts Stranger, Night Terrors, and Run, is currently raising funds on Kickstarter to complete his latest ambitious project, the werewolf short Werehouse. Like most of Young’s films, it will be penned by his frequent writing partner James Craigie.

As its name suggests, Werehouse will be a werewolf tale set inside, you’ve guessed it, a warehouse. A group of students seek refuge in the storage facility to escape from a violent protest, but they find that they may be in even greater danger after discovering that a ravenous beast may be trapped inside with them.

The short will star Amy Tyger, Harriet Rees, Oliver Roy, and Derek Nelson.

Werehouse will be shot in black and white, although the filmmakers are using a special technique to isolate the color red in order to highlight the copious amounts of blood shown onscreen. Should the funding be successful, filming is expected to commence in April, and the film will be released on Amazon Instant Video this Halloween.

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Los Angeles Overnight – Do Us a Favor and Watch This Exclusive Clip

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Weird. That’s exactly what this exclusive clip from the indie flick Los Angeles Overnight is, and we’re ready to share every pixel of it with ya! Why? Because we like weird. A lot.

The directorial debut of filmmaker Michael Chrisoulakis will launch a limited national, theatrical release on March 9, followed by a digital release through Freestyle Digital Media on March 20.

Synopsis:
Inspired by the L.A. Modern Noir genre and populated with distinct and dynamic characters, Arielle Brachfeld (Consumption) stars as Priscilla, a struggling actress who inherits a bevy of colorful villains after desperation drives her and her gullible boyfriend, a lovelorn mechanic (Azim Rizk, Billy Lynn’s Long Halftime Walk), to steal big from the Los Angeles underworld.

No amount of preparation could ever prepare this actress for a blood-soaked role filled with seedy criminals and “hot loot.” Entirely shot in Los Angeles, the cast is appropriately peppered with titans of the Hollywood scene including Peter Bogdanovich, Sally Kirkland, and recent CineAsia Lifetime Achievement Award recipient Lin Shaye.

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Exclusive Clip – Primal Rage

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