Who Should We Eat? - Last Meeple Standing Game Overview and Review - Dread Central
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Last Meeple Standing

Who Should We Eat? – Last Meeple Standing Game Overview and Review

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Ahhhhhhhh… the holidays. They are a time of love, sharing, kindness, and good food. But, what if you are stranded on a desert island with a bunch of folks who are willing to resort to good old “long pig” (you, that is…) to obtain that good food? This is the premise of the new game from WizKids, a company primarily know for wholesome games that do not deal with cannibalism.

How this little number came about, I’ll never know. I can only imagine how the elevator pitch for the semi-cooperative game Who Should We Eat? went: “So, we have an idea for a super bright, color-saturated, simple card game revolving around something like LOST where the Survivors of a crash on a deserted island are a little too ready to make a light snack of each other in order to stay alive and escape. We’ll say it is for ages 14 and up, but we’ll package it up like a Saturday morning cartoon…sorta like cigarette ads.

Photo Credit: Tiffany Hahn

I suppose that day, the execs at WizKids were extremely hung over, because they gave this game the green light, and I’m GLAD they did, as this game is good, clean human-eating fun!

COMPONENTS:

Keeping with WizKids standards, the components for this game, considering the light-weight nature of the gameplay, are top notch. The three boards used for tracking food, sanity, and building (for the getaway raft) are super-thick cardboard, heavy and sturdy. All of the cards used in the game are printed on thick, crisp cardstock that *snap* nicely when you shuffle them. The four tracking tokens used on the tracking boards are printed on the same cardboard, so they will likely hold up forever. Another nice touch is the first-player token. It’s a weighty wooden conch shell. It’s something beyond the call of duty for a game like this, as WizKids could have chosen to just go with a cardboard token. Good job, guys! There are also 10 “straws” printed on the same thick cardboard that are used to determine the winners of knife fights and who has to resolve a Quest.

SETUP:

Setup is pretty quick and painless (unlike dismembering and eating someone). First, place the three tracks for food (red), sanity (blue), and building (green) in the middle of the play area and find the survivor cards that match their color. Shuffle the matching survivor cards and place them on the corresponding tracks, leaving room for a discard pile. Place tracking tokens on each board (starting location dictated by the number of players). Shuffle the Quest deck and turn over three cards face up within reach of all players. Shuffle the Ghost deck (more about this cool thing soon…) and place it near the track boards. Deal each player a Role card. These cards will dictate turn order as well as provide a special power that role has access to during game play. The game comes with really cool “straws” (as in “draw for the short straw”) that are used during specific points in the game, so place them within reach of all players (when in any game are you told to place components OUT of reach of the players?). Then, in a really funny turn, the player who ate last takes the first player Conch and is called the Leader. You’re now ready to start planning who to devour.

GAMEPLAY:

The goal of Who Should We Eat? Is to manage your Food, Sanity, and raft Building in order to get off the island before you starve, go insane, or the Ghosts just plain get you before you can sail away. The order of play is split into five distinct phases: Morning Phase, Afternoon Phase, Evening Phase, Trial Phase, and Salvation Phase. Each phase has a number of sub-steps, which, while not super complicated, might take a while to explain, so I’ll talk about each phase in generalities, discussing what happens in each phase on a high level.

The Morning Phase is a kind of an “upkeep phase,” common in many games, where you pass the first player token to the next player, the Dead Return (yup, if you die in this game, you come back as a GHOST to fuck with the players that are still living…you are never fully removed from the game!), players draw their cards, and place cards they will play during a turn.

The Afternoon Phase entails the Leader choosing a “Quest” for the group from the previously displayed Quest cards. You’ll find these quests have various benefits and detriments: generally a negative effect for the player that draws the shortest “straw,” but a positive effect for the group as a whole. At this point, players, in turn order, resolve the effect of their Play card, adjusting the values on the various tracker boards per the effects of the cards.

The Evening Phase involves the players having to come to terms with what choices they made during the day. Sanity on the tracker is reduced 2 points, no matter how many players still survive. This is important, because if the sanity meter ever reaches 0, the Survivors lose their minds and the Ghosts win, ruling your own little Batavia island (excellent cannibal history). Then, all of the Survivors have to eat. Reduce the Food track by 1 for each survivor still in the game. If all of the Survivors have eaten and the Food track remains at 0 or above, play proceeds to the Salvation phase. If not, shit gets UGLY, and the players move on to the Trial Phase, entailing the said Trial and knife fights!

The Trial Phase involves three main elements:

(A) an actual trial, where players argue among themselves to fight for who should be sacrificed and eaten
(B) possible knife fights (losers determined by the drawing of “straws”), where Survivors can reveal a knife card in their hand and declare an attack on another player (who may reveal a shield card to protect themselves)
And (C) close of discussion (if there is not a knife fight) and a vote to determine who is going to be the soup of the day. Now, mind you, I’ve played a lot of downright grim games, but the Trial Phase of this cute, airy, lightweight game is one of the most brutal things I’ve experienced in my years of collecting. Friendships may be strained by this game if you don’t have the right play group. Yikes!

The Salvation Phase takes place if a Trial Phase is not required. It involves checking to see if the raft has been completed with enough food and sanity remaining, thus allowing the Survivors to hop on their raft and sail into the sunset…and hopefully not into shark-infested waters. If the raft is not ready during this phase, the Survivors awaken the next morning, ready to do it all over again until they go insane, starve, or escape.

Now, I mentioned Ghosts. These are an important and interesting element to the game. In the morning, if a player was eaten or knifed to death (how cheery), they come back as a Ghost and remain in the game to cause woe, stress, and complications for the remaining Survivors. Ghosts have their own deck of cards from which they draw. These cards allow ghost players to directly impact gameplay, limiting the types of cards that can be drawn and played, decreasing food or sanity, etc. The Survivors will truly come to hate the Ghosts, especially since the Ghosts can win the game. Also, when a player dies, the Sanity chart is decreased by two, so that again makes the game harder to win. As the game progresses, and the island becomes more infested with Ghosts, the living will come to hate life. The Ghosts will surly see to that.

WINNING:

The Survivors win if the Build tracker is equal to or above the Raft target at the end of a round in which the Survivors did not have to go to Trial. However, the Survivors lose if:
(A) the Sanity tracker hits 0 at any point
(B) a new Quest card cannot be revealed to fill the selection
Or (c) a Trial Phase begins in which there are only two Survivors remaining.

As I said, brutal. One way to win and three ways to lose.

FINAL THOUGHTS:

Who Should We Eat? is the kind of game you only want to play with the right crowd. Me? I love the theme of cannibalism, but some folks (with the last name Donner) might take offense. That rarely bothers me, but it might bother your play group. Beyond that, there is a lot of tension in this game surrounding arguments about who should be sacrificed or just plain gutted in a knife fight to ensure the survival of the rest of the Survivors. I can see hurt feelings taking place over this game if you don’t have the right people involved. There can be raised voices and a lot of “screw your neighbor” play, especially if someone knifes a few to many folks or the wrong person. I happen to LOVE a good cutthroat game, but some folks can’t handle conflict in a game (I’m looking at you, Rhado). The components, mechanics, and gameplay are good here. I commend WizKids for surprising me with this game, but while revenge is a dish best served cold, in Who Should We Eat?, it is the order of the day.

PRODUCT DETAILS:

Designers: Mike Harrison-Wood & Chris MacLennan
Artist: Pablo Hildago
Publisher: WizKids
Published: 2017
Players/Playtime: 4 to 10 (!) players/30 min

RATING:
3/5

Last Meeple Standing is brought to you by Villainous Lair Comics & Games, the ultimate destination for board game fanatics in Southern California. For more information visit the official Villainous Lair Comics & Games website, “Like” the Villainous Lair Facebook page and be sure to follow Villainous Lair on Twitter and Instagram.

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Last Meeple Standing

YOU Are the Maniac! – Game Overview and Review

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In the world of horror board games and card games, there is a glut of games where you and your fellow players portray the victims. The mechanics of the game itself act as the villain, or another player takes that role. These asymmetric games can be quite good, but they leave many players aching to be the bad guy, the maniac, and go after innocent (or not-so-innocent) victims to their blackened heart’s content. For those players, I present YOU Are the Maniac! (YATM for short). This wicked card game is designed to scratch just that itch, except with a chainsaw.

Photo Credit: Tiffany Hahn

COMPONENTS:

As a simple card game, YATM doesn’t need to shine very hard in the area of components. The four decks, Victim, Maniac, Plot Twist, and Final Girl, are printed on casino-style card stock, resulting in sturdy cards with a nice SNAP! when you shuffle them. The colors, particularly blood red, really pop, which is always nice. No washed out, muddy colors here. Your victims will have a hard time hiding in the shadows. The four decks have very distinct back designs, which makes clean up at the end of a game simple. The art on the face side of the cards is appropriately nightmarish, if not a tiny bit amateurish. Some of the characters are downright SUREAL. One victim, poor “Saul the Stoner” looks so outrageously deformed, his card provides enough horror to last the entire game. Victim cards are the cards you are fighting to collect throughout the game to give you points. Maniac cards allow you to manipulate the rows of Victims and allow you to take/kill the Victim card with the highest value. Plot Twist Cards alter the direction of the game to your advantage or to your opponent’s disadvantage. The Final Girl cards represent special victims that you face at the end of each round (which the game calls “movies” – there are three rounds or “movies,” so you a playing out a “trilogy”).

Believe it or not, one of the coolest components for the game is the box itself. It is very intentionally designed to resemble one of the old Cannon Films paper VHS boxes you would have pulled off the shelf and your friendly neighborhood video store when you were a kid. The edges of the box are designed to look worn and rubbed white, with cracks and tears at the corners and scratches from shelf wear. I have to hand it to the designer for nearly fooling me into thinking the game was packaged in a video box from the days of horror yore.

SETUP:

Setup is a breeze. Shuffle the four decks, Victims, Maniac, Plot Twist, and Final Girl, and deal out 12 Victims in two rows of 6, with the first card closest to the Victim deck. Place the Maniac, Plot Twist, and Final Girl decks below the Victim card area. Hand out 7 Maniac cards to each player and you are good to go…kill to your heart’s desire.

GAMEPLAY:

As mentioned earlier, the game is played over three rounds, with each round being referred to as a “movie.” A movie is completed when all 12 Victims plus a Final Girl have either been collected (killed) or have survived (moved to a Survivor pile to be dealt out as Victims in the next movie!). When it is your turn:

    1. Play a Maniac card. Some of these cards move Victims forward or backward in the line of 12 Victims. The goal is to get them to the Kill Spot, the No. 1 position in the row next to the Victim deck. Other Maniac cards are Mask or Weapon cards, which you have to play later in your turn to claim a victim.
    2. Move in for the Kill. Grab the Victim card from the Kill Spot next to the Victim Deck. If it has special instructions (drawing of Plot Twists or other guidance) on the card, carry them out.
    3. Optionally play a Weapon and/or a Mask card to achieve the kill. No weapon or mask = no kill (the Victim goes to the Survivor pile).
    4. If the Victim was killed, add the card to your Collection for point scoring later. You may want to sort them by Victim type (Bimbo, Athlete, Fodder, or Suspect) for ease of scoring at the end of the game. Do the same with your weapons and masks, as well as any other special cards that give you points.
    5. Clean up the mess. During this phase, move the remaining played Maniac and Plot Twist cards to their discard piles.
    6. Draw back up to a full hand from the Maniac deck.

When you have to draw Plot Twist cards, some of them are Nemesis cards. These cards force you miss the kill and place the Victim in the Survivor pile. You can defeat the Nemesis with special Defeat a Nemesis Maniac cards, though!

At the end of a “movie,” when all of the Victims have been killed or have escaped to the Survivors pile, you face the Final Girl. Killing the Final Girl in a movie is similar to fighting any other victim: you optionally play a Maniac card, but you HAVE to turn over a Plot Twist card and you HAVE to play a Mask and a Weapon Maniac card to defeat her. If not, she, too, goes into the Survivor pile to be faced again in the next movie.

At the end of the first movie, you deal out another 12 Victims, starting with cards in the Survivor pile and then moving to the Victim deck. You face a Final Girl, you move on to movie 2, play that round out, move on to movie 3 and then the game ends. Three movies and the audience is DONE with you.

WINNING:

At the end of the third movie, after the Final Girl has been offed…or has survived, you determine your score. Each victim in your Collection has a score value in the lower right of the card (on a bloody fingerprint). Add these scores up. Some Maniac cards may give you extra points for certain types of victims, how many victims you have, or how many weapons and masks you have. The player with the highest point total at the end of the game wins!

FINAL THOUGHTS:

YATM is one of the hardest games to rate for me in a long time. I like the quirky art, the perfect box, and the 80’s slasher movie theme, which is REALLY strong here; but, there is a big issue that a lot of reviewers have touched on. YATM is very much a re-skin of a previous game called Guillotine, from Wizards of the Coast. Both games are focused on moving victims down a row toward a Kill Spot, where they are snuffed and saved to score at the game’s end. Both games have a mechanic allowing players to move Victims up and down the row to allow you to kill Victims of higher value. Guillotine had a French Revolution skin. YATM has an 80’s slasher skin. If the two games were EXACTLY the same and I had no ethics whatsoever, which game do you think I would pick over the other? Yeah, you’re right: I’d pick YATM. That said, there are enough unique mechanics to give YATM a fair win over Guillotine for me, regardless of the re-skinning issue. I enjoy the Plot Twists the give the Maniacs certain advantages during a turn. I like the Maniac cards that reward you for trying to kill only a certain type of Victim. Hell, as weird as it is, I just plain like the box the game comes in! Lame, I know, but I do really dig it. In the end, rating this game comes down to which theme you like more, as well as a few other game mechanics, and not much else; hence, my somewhat low rating. Had YATM possessed a few more highlights, even just slightly more professional artwork, it would be the clear winner in this fight. YATM swung for the neck but only made it half-way through. In a cheeseball horror movie, we want to see the head come all the way off, and that doesn’t happen with this movie/game.

PRODUCT DETAILS:

Designer/Artist: Todd Wahoske
Publisher: Counterculture Cards/Golden Games
Published: 2013
Players/Playtime: 2–4/45 min

RATING: 2.5/5

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Machine of Death: The Game of Creative Assassination – Last Meeple Standing Game Overview and Review

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I’m going to kill you. Well, actually, me and few friends are going to snuff you. We are going to use… ummmmm… a bunch of old socks, a bucket of lighter fluid, and a piece of quartz to do it. Believe it. This is all because a machine that took a drop of your blood told you your cause of death would be “Blaze,” whatever that means. As assassins, it is our job to see you shuffle off your mortal coil in that manner (somehow, no matter how vague) using only a random assortment of items to force that death upon you. It’s a dirty job, but someone has to do it. And we LIKE our job. It makes us laugh, you see.

Photo Credit: Tiffany Hahn

In the world of Machine of Death: The Game of Creative Assassination (MoD for short), a device has been invented that uses a single drop of your blood it takes when you stick your hand in it to predict, in VERY vague terms, how you are going to die. The catch lies in that vagueness. When the machine spits out the card with your cause of death, it is going to be one or two words that may or may not make any sense to you. For example, the card that pops out of the machine might say “Elephant.” How the hell is an elephant going to kill you if you live in Modesto? Just avoid circuses and trips to Jakarta, right? Wrong. What about that billboard for Elephant brand tires that falls off a four-story building and squishes you into strawberry jam?

MoD puts players in the role of killers whose job it is to make sure the Machine of Death pays off in…well…death. The problem, and the fun, of the challenge is that you HAVE to use a randomly drawn assortment of items to send your victim on to the next life. If MoD didn’t have such a dark theme, I’d call it a party game. Wait…fuck it. It IS a party game. Who am I kidding? It is hysterically funny to try, within a limited amount of time, to bring about the timely end of your target.

COMPONENTS:

Shall I start drooling all over this game right away? Yes! Commence drooling. The hefty, glossy game box comes packed with goodies: a huge pack of Death Cards, the cards that pop out of the MoD; a big box of Black Market Gift Cards, the items used to kill the victims with; a pack of Specialist Cards, bonus cards you can be awarded with to aid in our murderous adventures; a book of Target Intel Sheets, slips where you list various important traits for your victim; a wooden Fate Coin, which is flipped at various points in the game to help with decisions; a Mission booklet; and a nifty, red, custom die with a skull symbol for the “1.” All of this schwag is top-notch, high-quality stuff. The art on the cards is whimsical and very functional. The Death Cards look like those cards that used to pop out of the Fortune-Telling Gypsy booths on the boardwalk when you put a quarter in. The Black Market Gift Cards are designed to look like credit cards on one side with cute iconography identifying the item in question. The Specialist Cards have really fun artwork depicting the helpers you are awarded with if you kill particularly well. Lastly, anyone who frequents this column knows I’m totally nutty for custom dice, and this game scores with theirs. An embossed skull? Yes, please!

SETUP:

Separate out and shuffle the Death, Black Market Gift, and Specialist Card decks, and place each deck nearby face down. Draw one Death Card face down to the table. Count out 20 of the Black Market Gift Cards face down as your “shopping budget” for the game and put the rest away. Create your victim on an Intel slip using the tables in the rule book or select one from the Mission booklet. This will give the players some important and helpful insight into the target, allowing them to manipulate both their tools and the target for the kill. Turn over the Death Card and draw three Black Market Gift Cards face up in a row. Put the sand timer nearby, and you are ready to annihilate the victim.

GAMEPLAY:

It is important to remember that the game is more about fun storytelling than beating the dice. The more the players work together to come up with good stories, the better the gameplay is going to be. If you lose, so what? The game sets up in moments and is ready to go again, with fresh people just lining up to visit with Death.

Each game lasts for four rounds (four assassination targets). Each round you will do the following in order:

  1. Generate a target.
  2. Make an assassination plan.
  3. Attempt the kill.

If you fail at any kill, you lose. Too bad, so sad. If the kill is successful, you stand a chance to earn bonus Specialist Cards before moving on to the next assassination.

To generate a target, you use a series of simple tables and basically answer questions Mad Libs style to come up with Name, two pieces of intel (such as likes, dislikes, fears, beliefs, etc.), and a location for them. This meta-game is sorta fun all by itself. Making up goofy characters to slaughter shortly thereafter is a good time, right?

Next, the players look at the gift cards that have been turned up and try to come up with a way to use them to bring about the demise of the target. Keep in mind that these gifts are not going to be simple, single words, like: chainsaw, acid, or rifle. More than likely, they will be something like “something red.” In this case you could say, for example, it is a pile of bricks, a red dump truck, or a red baseball bat. String together a story of sorts from all of the items you have to form the death plan. If you had the cards music, something red, and batteries, you could come up with: “We’re going to block him into an alley with a red dump truck, confuse him with loud Skinny Puppy music so he doesn’t try to escape, and then pour battery acid on him from above.” All is good and well, but now you have to, as a team, try to assign a difficulty, from 2 (easy) to 6 (hella hard), for each of the three parts. How hard is it to accomplish each part? You might say that backing the truck block the alley is easy, so a 2, but getting enough battery acid together to kill the person might be hard, so maybe a 5.

To attempt the kill, you turn over the sand timer and get started as quickly as possible, because once the timer runs out, it’s game over, man! Starting with the first item in your plan, select a player to roll the die, in an attempt to roll the decided-upon difficulty level or greater. If you succeed, move on to the next item! If you fail, discard that item card, draw another, and revise you plan using the remaining items. The remaining items can operate the same way they did before, or you can create new uses and new difficulty levels for them. Then start over, attempting to succeed with all three items in your plan. If you roll greater than the difficulty level you set for all three items, your assassination is carried off for that victim. If you still have time on the clock, roll the die and consult the Aftermath table, which will let you attempt to flee the scene, establish an alibi, cater the target’s wake (really), etc. by drawing one item card and attempting a plan against that item. Win and you get to roll again, draw again, and try again if there is still time on the timer. For each successful roll, you get to draw a Specialist card and set it aside for the moment. These cards allow you to switch them out for item cards on subsequent assassination attempts, basically giving you more options of a unique and interesting kind (e.g., “water into wine,” “killer solo,” or “flying saucer ride”).

WINNING:

You win by successfully killing all four targets. Good job. You’re a serial killer. You lose if at any time you run out of both Gift Cards and Specialists before all four targets are dead. You also lose if you fail to kill a target before the timer runs out. What? You think you get a lifetime to snuff anyone you want? Guess again, killer!

FINAL THOUGHTS:

By now, my enthusiasm for this game should be self-evident. I fricking LOVE MoD! The components are great, but the gameplay is even better! You’ve got a winner already, but I’ve been holding some info back from you, readers. This game is based on two awesome books of short stories delving into the possibilities of the wicked machine: Machine of Death and This Is How You Die. Both of them are chock full of hysterical…and creepy…stories of the fates of folks who fall victim to the machine. Not only that, but the website dedicated to this game, machineofdeath.net, is packed with bonus goodies for players: an Intel randomizer, timer music albums you can use in place of the sand timer (fun!), more missions, and target Intel blank sheets. Wow! The website also has pins, patches, posters, death certificates, t-shirts, etc. for fans to pick up if they love the game, which I suspect they will. Mind you, I’m not trying to sell you anything here, but WOW! What a bunch of cool-ass stuff! But wait, there’s MORE, and this may be the best part: there is a gigantor expansion for MoD. The Side Effects expansion includes more than 600 additional cards to plan deaths with: Death Cards, a Genre Deck, Intel, and what they call “Web Pals + Chums,” cards designed by famous Web personalities and illustrators (these cards are particularly awesome, according to ME).

There you have it…one of my favorite games in my collection. I’m happy to admit I have pretty much everything available for this game. Yes, I love assassination THAT much! This game is perfect for nights when you need a break from heavier games but are still in the mood for some mayhem and murder. I’ve rarely played MoD in public without some random stranger begging to please sit in on the next game. I strongly urge all of my readers to take the time and effort to find a copy and pick this up as soon as possible…or my friends and I will kill you.

PRODUCT DETAILS:

Designer: David Fooden, David Malki, and Kris Straub
Artists: Kris Straub
Publisher: TopatoCo
Published: 2013
Players/Playtime: 2-4 players/30 min
Suggested Player Age: 15+

RATING:
5/5

Last Meeple Standing is brought to you by Villainous Lair Comics & Games, the ultimate destination for board game fanatics in Southern California. For more information visit the official Villainous Lair Comics & Games website, “Like” the Villainous Lair Facebook page and be sure to follow Villainous Lair on Twitter and Instagram.

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We Are Dead: Zombie Massacre – Last Meeple Standing Game Overview and Review

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It is a fine Saturday afternoon. You and your friends are hanging out at the Mall (like you do), and as lunchtime rolls around, the savory scent of hot dogs wafts through the air straight to you. Making your way to the hot dog stand, you notice the vendor looks a little strange: wide, wild eyes; pale, almost greenish skin; and a shambling gait that makes him look like he might have recently been kicked in the nards. No matter…you’re gonna have those hot dogs or die. And that is EXACTLY what happens. After you nosh the proffered dogs, a blinding, stabbing pain hits you in the guts and you and your friends fall to the ground and shuffle off this mortal coil. However, you don’t STAY dead. Moments after biting the dust, you rise again…as a ZOMBIE. All of a sudden, those Shoppers in the Mall look much better than any bratwurst ever did. It is time to consume some consumers!

Photo Credit: Tiffany Hahn

COMPONENTS:

First off, let’s get the obvious out of the way: the awesome art. Mike Morris and Mike Collins are artists know primarily for their work in the animation field, creating animation for The Simpsons, Power Puff Girls, and Adventure Time, just to name a few. With that pedigree, you can rest assured that the art throughout this game is top notch and hysterical. Everything from the portrayal of the Heroes, to the Zombies (and what Zombies they are), and even the board is nuts on and perfect. I have to admit, it was the art that drew me to the game long before I knew anything at all about the game play. The characters look like they are going to pop off the cards and bite you on the ass (Zombies) or start busting heads (Heroes). You’re gonna like the art, trust me.

Everything, from the game board, to the cards, and even to the box has a linen finish, which is always a nice perk when it comes to games. It just adds to the “chrome” of the game, as they say. It is a finishing touch that just makes everything that much nicer to the touch and a little easier on the eye. Speaking of the box, the box is sturdy as hell! This is super nice, as many games these days are packaged in boxes that basically fall apart shortly after buying them, with the corners tearing and splitting, requiring some serious taping to keep them from falling apart.

 

 

All of the tokens in the game are printed on extra thick cardboard, as is the board itself, which is nice. This is another example of how the designers and publishers went that extra bloody mile to create a nice gaming experience. The cards are printed on nice, thick cardstock, also with a linen finish. They snap nicely when you shuffle them, which is a must-have in my book.

SETUP:

Set up is a little tedious. After picking player tokens, each of which imbues the player with a unique power that will help them throughout the game, and placing their scoring token on the “0” space on the scoring track, tedium rolls in. Sixty-six Shopper tokens must be randomly placed value-side-down on the board, which depicts the layout of the mall in a large grid of squares. The rules recommend that the players all randomly grab the face-down Shopper tokens and distribute them around the mall, but even this is bothersome and time-consuming, I think. Once this is done, a Horde scoring token is placed on the “0” place as well and two Horde tokens are set aside.

Each player is given six cards at random from the common stack of shuffled Attack, Hero, and Horde cards, keeping them secret from other players. They also receive two Infection tokens. Players place their Zombie token on the hot dog stand space on the board. Lastly, each player receives two Infection tokens, and the game is ready to play.

 

Set Up

 

GAMEPLAY:

The steps of gameplay are as follows:

(1) Movement: Players take turns moving their Zombie token on the board, three spaces at a time, in an attempt to reach a Shopper token and attempt to kill them. They can increase the distance they move by discarding cards or infection tokens.
(2) Attack: flip the Shopper token, defeat Heroes that a played against you, and attack the Shoppers.
(3) Discard/draw: Discard any/all cards but one and draw back up to 6. Reveal all Horde cards drawn.
(4) Resolve Horde attacks.

Yup, the gameplay really is that simple, but I’ll go into some detail for you here. Players are trying to kill as many Shoppers as they can, as they player with the highest number of kills wins the game. To do this, they move their counter until it is on a Shopper. The get three squares of movement each turn, but they can get an extra square for each card they discard or each Infection token they discard. Easy!

When you attack, you flip over the token to reveal how many Shoppers there are, the number printed on the bottom of the token. Once you have done this, the other players can attempt to prevent you from getting the kill by playing Hero cards against you. Non-active players can play a Hero card face down in front of them or pass. The active player (Zombie) selects one of the hero cards to defeat, revealing the strength printed on the Hero card. The non-selected Hero cards MAY be revealed to add +1 attack for each card thus revealed. To defeat the Hero, the Zombie player must discard Attack cards (plus Infection tokens for +1 strength), each of which has a strength printed on it, to meet (meat?) or beat the Hero attack strength. If they succeed, they get one point on the score track and may attempt to attack Shoppers. If they fail, they take one damage token and perform the negative effect described on the hero card.

Fighting Shoppers is much easier. The Zombie may slay as many Shoppers from the group as they can by discarding and Attack card for each Shopper to be slain. The Attack strength of the card does not matter. For each Shopper killed this way, the Zombie player advances their score token one space on the score track. Any number of shoppers they can’t defeat in this manner is considered to have run away, and the Shopper token is removed from the board.

After attacks are resolved, the Zombie player may discard any or all of their cards except one from their hand and draw back up to the hand size, which is six. After they do so, any player who revealed a hero card in an attack that turn draw one card each to replenish their hands.

This brings us to the Zombie Horde. Whenever a player draws a Horde card, they must lay it face-up on the table. The first time a Horde card is drawn, a Horde token is placed on the hot dog cart. Upon subsequent turns that reveal a Horde card, a second Horde token is revealed, but, more importantly, each Horde on the board moves 10 spaces toward the nearest Shoppers. Hordes will not move to the same Shoppers. Players then attempt to stop the Horde by scoring. The Horde will score a number of points equal to the Shopper value minus the number of Hero cards played against it. Hero toughness and effects are ignored. In this way, the Horde can effectively, possibly, outscore the players and deny them shoppers to attack! Damn the Horde straight to Hell! Those are my shoppers, and I’m going to eat them!

WINNING:

The number of points required to win varies, depending on the number of players: 50 pts for 2, 45 pts for 3, 35 pts for 4, and 30 pts for 5. The game can also end when the last Shopper token has been flipped over. In this case, the player with the highest score wins. That said, the blasted Zombie Horde can win the game, and all players LOSE, if the Horde has more points than the players. Stupid Zombies!

FINAL THOUGHTS:

It is hard to say anything bad about We Are Dead. It does what it sets out to do: it is a simple beer and pretzel game that doesn’t take a lot of thought to play. It has a bit of a “take that” mechanic in that other players playing Heroes against you can really knock your score down. It’s not a “roll you dice, move your mice” game that relies on the luck of the dice in order to score and win, which is nice. It forces you to think about where is best to move to block out other players from scoring and yet avoid the Horde. Some of the Hero cards have cool effects, such as the Hero “Harley Baconstein,” who forces you to only draw up to a hand of four if you lose against him, or “Rick Dixon AKS Mall Santa,” who deals damage equal to the number of Shoppers on the revealed token (yup, brutal). Once again, I have to come back to Morris and Collins’ artwork throughout the game. Hell, it is fun just to rifle through the cards to look at the hysterical art. The game is worth it just for the art. The game may be hard to find, as it was originally a successful Kickstarter project, but it DID make it to some stores for retail. If you look hard enough, you’ll find it. If We Are Dead sounds like the kind of game you want to play, there is nothing wrong with it. Really…I mean it. It’s fun to knock out over a bowl of chips and a good microbrew, but in a market chock full of zombie games that do this type of thing, but even BETTER, you might want to spend your zombie game bucks elsewhere.

PRODUCT DETAILS:

Designer: Derak Morrell
Artists: Mike Morris and Mike Collins
Publisher: Never Peak Games
Published: 2013
Players/Playtime: 2-5 players/45-90 min
Suggested Player Age: 13+

RATING:
2/5

Last Meeple Standing is brought to you by Villainous Lair Comics & Games, the ultimate destination for board game fanatics in Southern California. For more information visit the official Villainous Lair Comics & Games website, “Like” the Villainous Lair Facebook page and be sure to follow Villainous Lair on Twitter and Instagram.

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