Brad Dourif to be Honored at This Year's New York City Horror Film Festival - Dread Central
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Brad Dourif to be Honored at This Year’s New York City Horror Film Festival

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Brad Dourif NYC HFF

Brad Dourif has been whipping ass for many, many years in the horror genre and beyond so it makes perfect sense that he be honored! In fact… it’s LONG overdue.

From the Press Release:
At this year’s 15th edition of the New York City Horror Film Festival, broad-ranged character actor Brad Dourif, beloved to fright fans as the voice of killer doll Chucky, will receive the event’s Lifetime Achievement Award on Saturday, Oct. 28. The prestigious trophy honors Mr. Dourif for his long-ranging contributions to horror cinema, and the actor will accept in person.

Brad Dourif began his career on the stage where he was eventually noticed by Milos Forman and cast as Billy Bibbit in ONE FLEW OVER THE CUCKOO’S NEST, a role which earned him an Academy Award nomination for Best Supporting Actor. He has brought his craft to classic genre films including the John Carpenter-scripted EYES OF LAURA MARS; David Lynch’s DUNE and BLUE VELVET; and William Peter Blatty’s THE EXORCIST III. Dourif gained further renown for voicing Chucky in the CHILD’S PLAY franchise, the latest film of which, CULT OF CHUCKY, debuts this fall.

13 features and 31 short films make up this year’s festival, which opens Thurs Oct. 26, with a range of films including New York premieres of Mitchell Altieri’s THE NIGHT WATCHMEN; Norbert Keil’s REPLACE starring Barbara Crampton; Benjamin Arfmann’s DISMISSED starring Dylan Sprouse; Richard Stringham’s CLOSE CALLS; and Mathieu Turi’s HOSTILE starring Javier (IT) Botet; and the North American premiere of Michael Mongillo’s ghost story DIANE.

The festival runs October 26–29, at Cinépolis Cinemas, 260 West 23rd Street., at the corner of 8th Avenue and 23rd Street in the heart of New York’s Chelsea district, just one block over from the famed Chelsea Hotel, once home to Sid Vicious, Andy Warhol, Patti Smith, Jim Morrison, Bob Dylan, and Arthur C. Clarke.

The NYC Horror Film Festival was born in 2002 by filmmaker Michael J. Hein as a venue for newer independent horror filmmaking. After Michael’s passing in 2011, the festival created the Michael J. Hein Achievement Award to celebrate the hard work and perseverance of creators in the field. George Romero was the first recipient of the festival’s Lifetime Achievement Award, followed by other classic scaremeisters including Rob Zombie, Roger Corman, Frank Henenlotter, Robert Englund, Stuart Gordon, and the beloved late Wes Craven, Tobe Hooper, Angus Scrimm, and Herschell Gordon Lewis.

The full schedule for the New York City Horror Film Festival is here!

Brad Dourif NYC HFF

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Masters of the Universe Reboot Snags New Director(s)

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Four months ago we let you guys know that David S. Goyer was going to be directing the upcoming big-budget reboot of Masters of the Universe… but he has since dropped out of the director’s chair.

That said, Sony still views the He-Man property as a hot commodity and hopes this reboot will kick off a major new franchise, so today we have news via Variety that the reboot has snagged new directors in the form of The Nee Brothers.

The brothers co-directed the indie-thriller Band of Robbers. And while Goyer passed on directing the film, he’s still attached as writer/executive producer, and sources say he’s still extremely involved in the film’s development.

Are you excited for the upcoming reboot of Masters of the Universe? Let us know what you think in the comments below or on Facebook, Twitter, and/or Instagram!

The reboot is set to hit theaters December 18th, 2019.

Rundown:

Based on the beloved Mattel toy line, which spawned a successful animated TV series (1983-85) as well as a 1987 film. The property centers on the warrior He-Man, the last hope of a magical land called Eternia. Dolph Lundgren starred in the original pic as the title character, while Frank Langella played the villainous Skeletor.

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Interview: Imitation Girl Star Lauren Ashley Carter

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The Dread Central Presents title Imitation Girl is now available on VOD, and in preparation for its theatrical screening series (click here for theaters!), we were fortunate to sit down with indie starlet Lauren Ashley Carter to chat about her career, Imitation Girl, and working with female directors.

Here’s the film’s synopsis: “When an alien takes the form of an adult film star, both must learn to cope with the complexities of being human in this mesmerizing directorial debut from Natasha Kermani, with Lauren Ashley Carter (Darling) in the dual role of Julianna and the imitation girl.

Directed by Natasha Kermani, Imitation Girl stars Lauren Ashley Carter, Neimah Djourabchi, Adam David Thompson, and Catherine Mary Stewart.


Dread Central: Thank you so much for taking the time to talk with us. We’re very excited to release Imitation Girl. The performances you’ve given even within the world of independent horror have been vast and versatile. What sort of roles do you find you enjoy playing the most?

Lauren Ashley Carter: I choose the roles that appeal to me at the time, so obviously this changes as I get older. They’ve got to be different, otherwise I feel like I’m cheating myself and audiences. I enjoy characters that have to discover the world before they can be in it. I’ve yet to play a character that knows more than the audience. Maybe that’s next…

DC: Horror fans predominately know you as an actress, but you’ve also created your own short films and web series (and that Jackie Chan audiobook!) How do you determine the stories you want to tell as a creator compared to the roles you choose to play?

LAC: I have always been a creator first. I began writing plays when I was about six or seven years old and asking my classmates to act in them. I was appalled by some of the performances, to be honest, and fired a couple of my actors, stepped in and took on the roles myself. 

When I was living in NYC, most of the auditions I was going out for were for obnoxious characters: leaky robots that cried in a court house, and badly written, or under written, guest roles on TV shows. Others were for indie films that had no plot, other than awkward living room chats and uncomfortable sex scenes. And then commercial auditions where I’m standing next to some gorgeous 5’10” print model having to amuse a casting director with an anecdote about my breakfast. 

Rejection never bothered me, but the boredom and repetition of memorizing crap text drove me fucking bonkers. So, I started to create again. It’s so important to keep your mind fresh and to always have access to your imagination. It’s easy to lose that, and to let your mind atrophy, hustling to pay your bills and memorizing so much garbage. Creating new work is the best way to keep your imagination alive. Even if it doesn’t amount to dollar signs, even if it turns out to be more garbage-y than the garbage you were shitting on, it is rewarding, and it can tell you a lot about yourself. 

I like to tell stories about the world I see, and hopefully make people laugh when they look at it through my eyes. Comedy, my own sense of humor and the sense of humor of those closest to me, and also comedy content, got me through the toughest of times. I try to keep it light and have a sense of humor about the darkness because I don’t want to get sucked into the nothingness that’s on the other side. 

DC: In Imitation Girl, you play a character that works as an amateur porn star. Given the stigmas attached to sex workers, what drew you to this character?

LAC: I knew quite a few exotic dancers growing up. The least interesting thing about them was that they were exotic dancers. They were all extremely layered women, many of them hurt, drug addicts, mothers, caretakers, enthusiastic, volatile. They are so often reduced to their occupations. I’ve since worked on another project, specifically about a sex worker, and it’s a world that I want to explore more. Porn stars, amateur porn actors, cam girls, working girls, dancers- these are all occupations that I think a lot of us have thought about, maybe even tried for a time. The events that lead women to these jobs, whether they remain long term or not, all of this interests me. The stories of these women’s lives are so much richer than their job descriptions. And maybe if we know their stories, we will see them as flesh and blood. 

DC: I actually really hate this question, but the unfortunate reality is that there are so many people that don’t have any insight to how films are actually made. How do you feel working on set with a male director compared to a female director?

LAC: From person to person, as we know, we aren’t that much different. We have more in common than we don’t. The biggest difference I notice in the male/female dynamic is in numbers. When there are more women on a crew, or more female producers, things feel more calm, work gets done efficiently and without panic. I’m talking about my crews, I guess, because I can’t think of a time this has ever happened otherwise. We get compliments after about how much fun everyone had, how stress-free it was, and how they’d love to be back on set with us. 

I’ve only worked with one female film director, Natasha Kermani (on Imitation Girl), and she’s brilliant because she knows so much about every department. And I’ve worked with men that are absolutely wonderful, intuitive, caring, sympathetic, patient. Conversely, I’ve worked with men that are careless, destructive, arrogant, and downright sociopathic. So, the jury is out on the stats of all of this…but wouldn’t it be nice if we had the opportunity to know! What I’m saying is, there aren’t enough female directors working. 

DC: I couldn’t agree with you more. Last question, something fun. If you had the opportunity to play an iconic horror character in a remake, what character would you play and why?

LAC: Well, I would never want to step into the shoes of an icon, that’s exactly how you twist an ankle and fall on your face, BJ. But if I must, then I’d love to take on Quint from Jaws. That’s pretty much my personality after a bottle of wine, anyway. Just throw me on a boat and roll the cameras. 

Lauren Ashely Carter is also the curator for the March edition of Box of Dread! There are only a few unclaimed boxes at the time we are writing these words so sign up now before they sell out and are gone forever! Reserve your subscription by clicking here.

For even more pictures and videos, check out Box of Dread on social media! If you have any questions or concerns, always feel free to contact us at support@boxofdread.com, and we’ll do whatever we can to make things all right in your horror-loving world.

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Walking Dead Movie In the Works?

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The season 8 finale of The Walking Dead recently scored the lowest views of one of the show’s season finales since the very first. Ouch. But that doesn’t seem to be deterring the powers that be behind the scenes from thinking bigger.

In fact, former showrunner Scott Gimple recently talked about the possibility of a The Walking Dead with Vulture saying, “That kind of variety, that’s we’re talking about. All the differences of the ways we tell the story, yeah, what we can feature and all that. There’s a whole universe of possibilities.”

Hurm. I know AMC wants to keep the series going in any way possible so a movie doesn’t seem out of the question. But I wonder if enough people would want to shell out cash to see it in theaters?

How would you feel about a The Walking Dead movie? Make sure to hit us up and let us know what you think in the comments below or on Facebook, Twitter, and/or Instagram!

Synopsis:

Based on the comic book series written by Robert Kirkman, this gritty drama portrays life in the months and years that follow a zombie apocalypse. Led by former police officer Rick Grimes, his family and a group of other survivors find themselves constantly on the move in search of a safe and secure home. But the pressure each day to stay alive sends many in the group to the deepest depths of human cruelty, and Rick discovers that the overwhelming fear of the survivors can be more deadly than the zombies walking among them.

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