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Some B-Movies Are Actually Worth a Damn

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Zombeavers

Let’s face it… if a film is produced on a budget south of a few million dollars, we have a natural tendency to label those films B-movies. That’s never been a title I care for, and I’m not keen on the idea of labeling any low-budget picture a B-movie.

Halloween was shot on a budget that hovered around $300,000; Black Christmas was shot on a budget of $620,000; The Blair Witch Project was assembled on a paltry $60,000 budget; Paranormal Activity was shot for less than $12,000; the awesome zombie flick The Battery cost $6,000 to film; and speaking of low budget zombie fare, Night of the Living Dead, arguably the most important horror film to be released in the last five decades, cost just $114,000.

Every single film listed above went on to become a commercial success, with the exception of The Battery, which gains more followers with open wallets every day.

Zombeavers

These films are proof that sometimes a B-movie is destined for greatness, and as that greatness begins to swallow the perception of the productions, we tend to forget that they were cheap films to begin with.

The following films haven’t had a chance to blossom into fan favorites just yet, but they’re all excellent pictures that were shot on shoestring budgets, and it won’t be a surprise to learn that some of these movies go on to develop an unwavering fan base.

Zombeavers (Budget unknown)
Loaded with insane animatronics and puppet work, along with some amazing frat-comedy and memorable characters, Zombeavers is one of the more entertaining zom-coms to come our way in ages. Really, how do you botch a lighthearted flick about zombie beavers? We get all the things we want from cheap horror: strong comedy, a few very gruesome death scenes, practical effects piled on practical effects and even a little nudity. If you haven’t seen this treasure, do so ASAP!

The Cabining (rumored $3 million budget)
The Cabining arrived on the market and then fizzled out immediately. The problem is that it’s an awesome movie that blends slasher elements with satirical elements, and it comes together beautifully. There are a number of amazing characters (Bo Keister steals the show) in the lineup, and the script is far wittier than some may anticipate. It’s a flick with great twists, so we won’t speak on them here, but we will give you a heartfelt recommendation: Watch this movie!

Piranha ($660,000 budget)
I’m not talking about Alexandre Aja’s remake or even Piranha 3DD; I’m talking about Joe Dante’s overachiever of a Jaws ripoff. The picture may now be nearly 40 years old, but it’s still an amazing little picture that produces some amazing onscreen chemistry (that feels like constant and believable sibling rivalry) between the film’s two leads, Paul Grogan (Bradford Dillman) and Heather Menzies-Urich (Maggie). For a flick looking to ride the wave of Jaws, the movie is stellar, moving at a speedy pace and even giving viewers some solid practical special effects. This is – no doubt – the greatest aquatic horror to arrive on the heels of Spielberg’s famed film… and it emerged a winner with a very, very modest production budget.

Wolfcop ($740,000 budget)
Wolfcop is one of the best werewolf films to hit the market in years. It’s got everything you could want from a lycanthropic tale. It’s gory, it’s well-shot, the script is top-notch and the characters, good and bad, are all extremely memorable. Writer/director Lowell Dean stretched a thin budget to maximum effectiveness, and that demands applause. The fact that this is a legitimately original story only helps to endear the flick to fans. And to think it all happened on a budget south of $1 million. Impressive, Lowell, very impressive!

Son of Ghostman (Budget unknown)
Son of Ghostman is less a horror film and more a picture about coming to grips with the disappearance of horror hosts while juggling a blossoming love. But there are plenty of horror aspects alive in the production, and seeing an awesome new horror host just hits a special place in the heart. Don’t look for big bombastic sequences; rather, keep an eye out for amazing characters and an obvious love for vintage genre fare.

Editor’s Note: Since the writing of this article, D.C. contributor Matt Molgaard has passed on. It’s an honor for us to share his final insights with you all. He will be sorely missed.

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Vampire Hunter D: The Series Gets Writer For Pilot Episode

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It’s been a little while since we’ve heard news about “Vampire Hunter D: The Series”, the CG-animated series based on Hideyuki Kikuchi’s titular character. However, some new news broke today over at ANN as they’ve reported that Brandon Easton, who is writing the scripts for new Vampire Hunter D comics, has been tapped by Unified Pictures to write the pilot for the series. The pilot will be based on Kikuchi’s “Mysterious Journey to the North Sea” storylines, which make up the 7th and 8th titles in the book series. Unified is making this series in conjunction with Digital Frontier, the Japanese animation studio behind the CG Resident Evil titles.

Easton told the site, “I’ve had to manage the expectations of three entities: the creator Hideyuki Kikuchi, the producers at Digital Frontier and Unified Pictures, and ultimately myself. This means that you have to find new and exciting ways of telling a story that has a set of concrete rules that have been fully established by the novels.

Meanwhile, the studio has also announced that Ryan Benjamin is taking over as the artist and colorist on the Vampire Hunter D: Message From Mars series with Richard Friend inking the issues.

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Watching A Quiet Place’s John Krasinski Get Scared by Freddy on Ellen Will Brighten Your Day

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I was just researching the new Platinum Dunes horror-thriller A Quiet Place and stumbled across this video. It features the film’s writer-director and star John Krasinski getting scared by a man dressed as Freddy Krueger on “Ellen.”

It’s as much fun as it sounds, and I’m sure it will make your day. It sure as hell just brightened mine.

Give it a watch below, and then let us know what you think!

John Krasinski directs the film, which will be the opening night entry at this year’s SXSW festival in Austin, TX. Emily Blunt stars alongside Krasinski, Noah Jupe, and Millicent Simmonds.

A Quiet Place will then open wide on April 6.

Synopsis:
In the modern horror thriller A Quiet Place, a family of four must navigate their lives in silence after mysterious creatures that hunt by sound threatens their survival. If they hear you, they hunt you.

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Interview: Director Jeff Burr Revisits Leatherface: The Texas Chainsaw Massacre III

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Director Jeff Burr was gracious enough to give us here at Dread Central a few minutes of his time to discuss the Blu-ray release of his 1990 film Leatherface: The Texas Chainsaw Massacre III. Recently dropped on 2/13, the movie has undergone the white-glove treatment, and he was all-too-happy to bring us back to when the film was being shot…and eventually diced thanks to the MPAA – so settle in, grab a cold slice of bloody meat, read on and enjoy!

DC: First off – congrats on seeing the film get the treatment it deserves on Blu-ray – you excited about it?

JB: Yeah, I’m really happy that it’s coming out on Blu-ray, especially since so many people bitch and moan about the death of physical media, and this thing made the cut, and it’s great for people to be able to see probably the best-looking version of it since we saw it in the lab back in 1989.

DC: Take us back to when you’d first gotten the news that you were tabbed to be the man to direct the third installment in this franchise – what was your first order of business?

JB: It was fairly condensed pre-production for me, and there really wasn’t a whole lot of time to think about the import or the greatness of it – it was basically just roll up your sleeves and go. It was a bit disappointing because a lot of times in pre-production you have the opportunity to dream what could be – casting had already been done, but certain decisions hadn’t been made yet. A very condensed pre-production, but exciting as hell, for sure! (laughs)

DC: R.A. Mihailoff in the role of Leatherface – was it the decision from the get-go to have him play the lead role?

JB: No – I totally had someone else in mind, even though R.A. had done a role in my student film about 7 years earlier, and we’d kept in touch, and I’d felt strongly because I’d gotten to know him a bit that Gunnar Hansen should have come back and played Leatherface, which would have given a bit more legitimacy to this third movie. He and I talked, and he had some issues with the direction that it was going – he really wanted to be involved, and it ended up boiling down to a financial thing, and it wasn’t outrageous at all – it wasn’t like he asked for the moon, but the problem was that New Line refused to pay it, categorically. I think the line producer at the time was more adamant about it than anyone, and Mike DeLuca was one of the executives on the movie, and he was really the guy that was running this, in a creative sense. I made my case for Gunner to both he and the line producer, and they flat out refused to pay him what he was asking, so after that was a done “no deal” I decided that R.A would be the right guy to step into the role. Since New Line was the arbiter of the film, he had to come in and audition for the part, and he impressed everyone and got the part. He did an absolutely fantastic job – such a joy to work with, and he was completely enthusiastic about everything.

DC: Let’s talk about Viggo Mortenson, and with this being one of his earliest roles – did you know you had something special with this guy on your set?

JB: Here’s the thing – you knew he was talented, and I’d seen him in the movie Prison way back in the early stages of development and was very impressed with him, and he was one of those guys that I think we were really lucky to get him on board with us. I really believe that The Indian Runner with he and directed by Sean Penn was the movie that truly made people stand up and notice his work. Every person in this cast was one hundred percent into this film and jumped in no questions asked when it was time to roll around in the body pits.

DC: It’s no secret about the amount of shit that the MPAA put you through in order to get this film released – can you expound on that for a minute?

JB: At the time, I believe it was a record amount of times we had to go back to the MPAA after re-cutting the film – I think it was 11 times that we went back. What a lot of people don’t realize is after Bob Shaye (President of New Line) had come into the editing room and he thought that it was very disturbing, and cut out some stuff himself. He thought that it would have been banned in every country, and it was banned in a lot of countries but so were the previous two. It was definitely on the verge of being emasculated before even being submitted to the MPAA, and I would have thought just a few adjustments here and there – maybe a couple of times to go back…but eleven? It was front-page news in the trade papers then, and I think that the overall tone of the film was looked at as being nasty. The previous film (Chainsaw 2) had actually gone out unrated, and with the first film being so notorious, I think it was a combination of all of that, and now even the most unrated version of this would be rated R – that’s how far the pendulum has swung in the other direction.

DC: Looking back at the film after all this time – what would be one thing that you’d change about the movie?

JB: Oh god – any film director worth his salt would look back at any of their films and want to change stuff up, and with this being 28 years old, I can look back and say “oh yeah, I’d change this, this and this!” You grow and learn over the course of your time directing, and this was my third movie and my first without producers that I had known, so the main thing that I’d do today would be to make it a bit more politically savvy. I had always thought that they wanted me to put my vision on this film, and that wasn’t necessarily the case, so maybe I’d navigate those political waters a little better.

DC: Last thing, Jeff – what’s keeping you busy these days? Any projects to speak of?

JB: Oh yeah, I’ve got a couple of movies that I’m working on – I’m prepping a horror movie right now, and then I’ve got a comedy film that I’m doing after that. You haven’t heard the last of me! I’ve had a real up and down (mostly down) career, but I still love it – it’s what I love to do, and it’s still great that after 28 years people still want to talk about this movie, and are still watching it – that’s the greatest gift you can get, and I thank everyone that’s seen it and talked about it over all these years.

BUY IT NOW!

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