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Gore Verbinski Talks A Cure For Wellness

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Cure for Wellness

Gore Verbiniski, most famous for his Pirates of the Caribbean movies, returns to his horror roots with A Cure for Wellness, and we sat down with him to get you guys the skinny.

Dread Central: You haven’t done an outright horror movie in awhile. What is it that keeps you coming back?

Gore Verbinski: Well I think it’s one of the genres where you can kind of slip into a dream logic. I mean, I think when Danes character Lockhart makes his way to this place he’s kind of out of bounds, off the map and this sort of waking state slips away and I think we’re kind of entering the place of dreams and nightmares. I think with that kind of narrative you can prey on the audiences motivation to discover and you can use enigma and, there’s sort of two ways to tell a story, there’s a hand on your back leading an audience through a story and there’s the sort of breadcrumb approach. This genre, I think when you use the breadcrumb approach, you can get people sort of nibbling and going, I don’t know why this makes sense but it makes sense in a way, not a waking state but in a way we dream then you can affect them. That little squeaky door in your forehead opens up and you kind of let us have access to your hard drive and you’re watching Dane’s character reluctantly become a patient of this place, when you’re in the darkened room and we’re using sound and image to conduct a psychological experiment on the audience, yeah, I think dreams have real value.

DC: What is the cure, and what’s the sickness?

GV: Well, it’s a good question, I think in our, in kind of creating this place that has maybe observed humanity for a long time, in an ancient castle above the clouds and it’s seen the industrial revolution, it’s seen personal computers and our obsession with our devices, it’s sort of diagnosing modern man if you will. I think the people who are particularly vulnerable are ones who have done anything it takes to succeed and get ahead so this place is sort of praying upon oligarchs and heads of industry and in this case Lockhart, who is going to do anything to kind of succeed but that’s not really wellness, money and success are not really, particularly in the case of Lockhart who, he doesn’t make a padre of shoes or guitars, he makes money off of other people who might make something. So the idea was to kind of hand pick the people who come to this place because director Volmer is kind of offering absolution, he’s saying you’re not responsible because you’re not well, and that sort of note from doctor I think in the initial phase, that’s what keeps them there, it’s they’re kind of narcotic if you will and then the twist is, what if the cure is worse than the disease. I think there’s something, we live in this increasingly irrational world and there’s a reason why we you know, why we’re going to buy these pharmaceutical prescriptions that have side effects is just ridiculous, and whether you’re doing that or having a kale wrap or whatever, we must at our core sense that something is not right or we wouldn’t be susceptible to that.

DC: Is this a studio movie?

GV: It’s not a Fox movie. It’s a New Regency movie, Fox is distributing it so Fox has no money in the movie at all, this is purely a New Regency production, they have a deal with our distributor through Fox. I don’t think they’re an indie but certainly a mini-major, New Regency, and so yeah, we don’t have the means, we live in a time where if I wanted the means to make a story on the scale of what David Lean would have done in the day, you need a theme park or a toy or a superhero, you’re not going to get that so this is more of a case of setting off to Germany with a bag half full or quarter full, but then you’re a bit more off the radar. We were fortunate enough to be left alone and we stayed moderately scaled enough that we could travel to all of these locations. You’re seeing this place as one place but it’s actually fifteen different locations, pieced together to feel like one place, so we were all over Germany and I think if you can stay the right size you can go to a castle for eleven days for exteriors. We found an old hospital in Belitz that was run down and with some fresh paint and new windows we kind of made that our interior and then we needed a swimming pool so we travelled to Swicow where we found this old swimming pool, the tile matched the same color as our hallways and you have to build it like that, try to get a sense of something yeah, cinematic.

DC: Did you have to fight to do an R rated movie?

GV: If you’re asking how we did it, I don’t know, hypnosis? I’m not quite sure how, it’s a good point, how we were allowed to do it. I suppose New Regency were very supportive and slightly pre-occupied with other movies. Yeah, I’m a big fan of the genre from the seventies when it took a little more time and I think when it’s elevated, the genre has this sense of something inevitable, as in the sound and composition, something is happening, pulling the camera down the corridor, it’s pulling the protagonist towards his epiphany and I think for this movie we kept on thinking of that as kind of a sickness, the cancer, the black spot on your x-ray, the thing that is sort of present and Lockhart’s character is in denial I think but the film’s not in denial so composition and framing and sound become really, really important because they have to feel there’s a promise, or there’s a sickness or cancer underneath and I think trying to make that a voice, that’s the voice of the movie itself. Look, it’s very difficult these days to go to a movie and not know what you’re seeing before you get there and so trying to make something where you come and say I know nothing about this, like we used to, we used to go to movies and not know what was going to happen and what the story was.

DC: We noticed a lot of mirrors, and reflections on water.

GV: Well I think the movie is really about two worlds. There’s the world Lockhart comes from and there’s the world of Volmer which is, and I think at the end of this journey, Volmer and Lockhart don’t belong to either of these worlds so it was important to, even in the steam room, that sort of sense that the door’s closed and another door is opening, that we’re moving between two points of view and yeah, how we see things. There’s a lot of reflections… know, Dane’s body separating from himself. For me, I always loved the end of The Graduate, where you didn’t know where they were going and they sort of rejected both of these places and the ambiguity of that and I think youth today particularly, there’s a sense that our father’s fathers told us to work hard, get ahead, succeed and I think you see more kids taking a gap here in college kind of saying, in a world with less and less we don’t think objectively anymore, I think you get the sense that we’re out of room, it’s like an amoeba in a test tube, right? If they’re growing exponentially, the last thing they say to each other is, we don’t have a problem, it’s half empty and then it’s like bam, we hit the wall, like we don’t have a sense of velocity that we’re progressing at and I think you do have one of two worlds and it’s time to sort of step off the treadmill and go wait, time out, maybe this isn’t the best plan. Maybe it was but it isn’t anymore.

DC: With such dreamlike material, did the move come out as you’d envisioned from the beginning?

GV: Yeah, I mean we always knew there was a danger of getting thrown off the rails but that’s why, and if you watch it again, the little tune, there’s something very gothic happening at the very beginning as well, the wax seal and the lullaby and it’s almost like, I wanted a sense of this movie could go there at any time and yeah, I’m pretty happy with it, it’s definitely dangerous.

DC: Where do you think the horror genre is headed?

GV: Well, we’ve really distilled it down to the pop out scale, in many ways, and you see some ninety minute, some great horror in terms of refining that element. I’m just, I think the potential of it, the potential for the narrative to slip into a dream logic, not into the waking state, I think it’s headed into the direction of being refined, distilled, we know what we expect and this movie is making a choice to not go in that direction but it’s definitely headed there. Are you a fan of the films of the seventies? I think there’s something about sitting around a campfire and telling stories, there’s something about a group of strangers in a place together, being told a story that is greater than the sum of its parts. We spend so much time trying to compose the image, the sound, I would hope this is something that people get a chance to see in a theater, but it’s a big ask, to get people to get in their car, to pay too much for popcorn and drive to a movie theater, it’s a huge ask. Hollywood is trying to eventize that experience, to try and keep you coming and the process of eventizing means all the good writers are running to TV so you have, the fabrics tearing and it’s just getting further and further apart and we’re kind of saying everybody’s run away from the middle. Look, if it finds it’s champions hopefully we get to do, not the same thing again, but we get to operate in this place again, which I think would be nice because it’s easier to get one hundred and fifty million dollars than it is to get thirty, if you just need some giant robots or something, or you can get eight, but this is the hardest area to operate in.

DC: Tell us about working with Bojan Bazelli, your DP.

GV: Yeah, Bojan is, we have a very strange relationship, you’d have to come by the set and see, but I love his passion. He will easily leave the narrative, he will just drift off so there is the constant sort of, you have to keep your spurs in him but it’s a symbiotic thing, it’s a dance.

Dane DeHaan, Jason Isaacs, and Mia Goth star. The screenplay is by Justin Haythe; story by Justin Haythe and Gore Verbinski, who directed.

Look for A Cure for Wellness in theaters on February 17, 2017.

Synopsis:
An ambitious young executive is sent to retrieve his company’s CEO from an idyllic but mysterious “wellness center” at a remote location in the Swiss Alps. He soon suspects that the spa’s miraculous treatments are not what they seem. When he begins to unravel its terrifying secrets, his sanity is tested, as he finds himself diagnosed with the same curious illness that keeps all the guests here longing for the cure.

A Cure for Wellness

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Want a LEGO Godzilla Set? Here’s Your Chance!

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The longest-running franchises in cinema history, the Godzilla films have created a cultural icon in the form of the titular beast. Simply hearing its roar or seeing its silhouette is enough to let us know precisely what we’re looking at. Having ventured out of cinema and forayed into TV shows, comic books, video games, and countless merchandise options, Godzilla still hasn’t managed to break into one of the world’s most popular toy company: LEGO. However, that might change if BRICK_101 has their say via LEGO Ideas, where they submitted a design based on the 1954 original film!

Here’s the description from the site:
This model contains approximately 850 LEGO pieces, stands 9 inches (23 cm) tall, and measures 17 inches (44 cm) from head to tail. Godzilla has had many different designs over the years, but we based ours on the original 1954 movie. The arms, legs, jaw, and tail are hinged to allow the model to be posed in a variety of positions. In addition to Godzilla, the set also includes a small microscale train for Godzilla to stomp on or chomp on and a flame piece to represent Godzilla’s atomic breath.

The website allows people to submit their own ideas (such as this Call of Cthulhu set) and then allow the public to vote on whether or not they want to see it get made. Should the idea get 10,000 votes, it then gets moved up the ladder within LEGO’s headquarters and a decision is made to see if they want to make an official set.

So, if you want to see LEGO make an official Godzilla set, click on the link above and cast your vote!

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#Brainwaves Episode 78 Guest Announcement: Legendary Film Composer Harry Manfredini

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The Friday the 13th franchise without the music of Harry Manfredini would be like peanut butter without jelly. McDonalds without the Big Mac. Knetter without Creepy. His music defined a generation of horror fans, and few could have done it better, if at all. Now Manfredini brings his equally as unique voice to Brainwaves Horror and Paranormal Talk Radio.

Join us this coming Wednesday, February 21st, at 8:00PM PT/11:00PM ET for all the shenanigans fit to be had!

It’s radio without a safety net, kids. It’s Brainwaves: Horror and Paranormal Talk Radio.

SUPPORT BRAINWAVES ON PATREON!

Listen to Stitcher

Brainwaves: Horror and Paranormal Talk Radio is available to subscribe to on iTunes and Stitcher.

Spooky, funny, touching, honest, offensive, and at times completely random, Brainwaves airs live every Wednesday evening beginning at 8:00 PM Pacific Time (11:00 midnight Eastern Time) and runs about 3 hours per episode.

Knetter and Creepy will be taking your calls LIVE and unscreened via Skype, so let your freak flags fly! Feel free to add BrainWavesTalk to your Skype account so you can reach us, or call in from a landline or cellphone – 858 480 7789. The duo also take questions via Twitter; you can reach us at @BrainwavesRadio or @UncleCreepy, @JoeKnetter, or @MrDarkDC using the hashtag #BrainWaves. You can also check us out on our Brainwaves Discord channel!

Have a ghost story or a paranormal story but can’t call in? Feel free to email it to me directly at UncleCreepy@dreadcentral.com with “Brainwaves Story” in your subject line. You can now become a fan of the show via the official… BRAINWAVES FACEBOOK PAGE!

Brainwaves: Horror and Paranormal Talk Radio is hosted live (with shows to be archived as they progress) right here on Dread Central. You can tune in and listen via the FREE TuneIn Radio app or listen to TuneIn right through the website!

For more information and to listen live independent of TuneIn, visit the Deep Talk Radio Network website, “like” Deep Talk Radio on Facebook, and follow Deep Talk Radio on Twitter. And don’t forget to subscribe to Brainwaves on iTunes.

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Supernatural Irish Horror Beyond the Woods Hits Home Video and VOD This February

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Supernatural Irish horror Beyond the Woods makes its way to DVD and VOD from Left Films!

Shot on location in Ireland, Beyond the Woods echoes the creepy supernatural horror of recent Irish genre hits The Hallow and The Canal, with its eerie and grisly tale of an unknown evil.

Synopsis:
Seven friends meet up in the Irish countryside for a secluded weekend getaway but unfortunately for them a fiery sinkhole has opened up in the mountains nearby. It’s burning hot, spewing out sulphur and casting a hellish stench over the local area. Determined to make the most of the weekend, the group decide not to let the noxious atmosphere get to them…but it’s getting worse. Soon the troubling hallucinations begin as an ancient evil starts to take hold. What malevolent force has crawled from the sinkhole and will any of them survive the weekend?

Following a successful run on the festival circuit where it picked up the Best Feature Film Award at the World International Film Festival Montreal in 2017, Seán Breathnach’s spine-chilling low budget nightmare finally makes its way to UK and North American DVD and VOD courtesy of Left Films.

On digital/VOD February 5th, DVD February 19th.

UK DVD AMAZON
UK VOD ITUNES
US VOD ITUNES

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