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First Stills and Sales Art – The Countess

One of history’s most intriguing figures is Elizabeth Bathory, whose nickname, the “Blood Countess”, refers to the legendary accounts of her bathing in the blood of virgins in order to retain her youth. Acclaimed French actress Julie Delpy has taken on Bathory’s persona in The Countess, which she also directed. It’s been about a year since the trailer made its way online, but now with Cannes in the air the first stills and early sales art have come to light.

Dig on them below after the plot crunch.

Synopsis
The true story of Countess Bathory born in 1560. At the age of 14, she married a powerful warlord, 10 years her senior. Although their relationship became cold and distant, she bore him four children. While he was away fighting wars, she kept up their estate with the help of her confidant, the witch Anna Darvulia, becoming increasingly powerful. She was feared, admired, and loathed by many; even the King had to obey her wishes. After her husband died, she met a handsome young man. They fell passionately in love. However, she was desperately concerned that she was not young enough to keep him. For 12 years she waited for his return and, in mad desperation, began to bathe in the blood of virgins, convinced that it would provide her with eternal youth and beauty, setting in motion the chain of bloody and treacherous events that led to her demise.

Early reports on The Countess are that it’s more a tragic story of a love that cannot be rather than a true genre film, but we’ll continue keeping an eye on it and let you know once US distribution has been finalized.

First Stills and Sales Art - The Countess

First Stills and Sales Art - The Countess

First Stills and Sales Art - The Countess

First Stills and Sales Art - The Countess

First Stills and Sales Art - The Countess

First Stills and Sales Art - The Countess

Uncle Creepy

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Steve Barton

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  • Terminal

    I always picture Lady Bathory as this amazing beautiful enticing woman. Julie Delpy is pretty but… I don’t get a woody when I see her.
    ———-
    “We are bad guys. That means we’ve got more to do other than bullying companies. It’s fun to lead a bad man’s life.”

    • The Woman In Black

      What’s considered beautiful and enticing definitely changes with the times. Just look at art over the centuries. The skinny minnies of today would be considered extremely ugly by comparison. If only I’d lived back in Rubens’ day!

      • Terminal

        Yep fat chicks were considered sexy because it indicated she was wealthy and well fed. Now they’re being kicked off of planes and are being forced to buy two seats every time they travel.

        But still Delpy is pretty as hell, but not sexy.
        ———-
        “We are bad guys. That means we’ve got more to do other than bullying companies. It’s fun to lead a bad man’s life.”

  • FireRam

    Synopsis
    The true story of Countess Bathory born in 1560.

    UM…..WRONG! Unless you consider “BREADCRUMBS” based on a true story also(a fairy tale). The fact that Bathory bathed in blood is a myth.
    Bathory was a Hungarian countess. She is considered the most infamous serial killer in Hungarian and Slovak history and is remembered as the Bloody Lady of Achtice after the castle near Trencsén, in Royal Hungary, in present-day Slovakia, where she spent most of her life. After her husband’s death, she and her four alleged collaborators were accused of torturing and killing dozens of girls and young women. In 1610, she was imprisoned in Achtice Castle, where she remained until her death three years later. Her nobility allowed her to avoid trial and execution. In 1610, King Matthias (spurred on by rumors) sent men to investigate Bathory. The men reportedly found one girl dead and one dying. Another woman was found wounded and others locked up. Her initial victims were local peasant girls, many of whom were lured to Achtice by offers of well-paid work as maidservants in the castle. Later she may have begun to kill daughters of lower gentry, who were sent to her gynaeceum by their parents to learn courtly etiquette. Abductions seem to have occurred as well. The most consistently described atrocities collected from testimony of witnesses are: severe beatings over extended periods of time, often leading to death, burning or mutilation of hands, sometimes also of faces and genitalia, biting the flesh off the faces, arms and other bodily parts, starving of victims. The use of needles was also described. The number of young women tortured and killed by Elizabeth Báthory is unknown, though it is often cited as being in the hundreds, between the years 1585 and 1610. The idea that Countess Bathory bathed in the blood of her victims is folklore. Elizabeth was never brought to trial but remained under house arrest in a single room until her death.

    ———————–
    SILENCE…..I KILL YOU!

  • Cash Bailey

    I’ve been waiting to see this for what seems like years.

  • Emy

    I really want to see this. Drama or horror or whatever genre t’s in. The costumes alone look like they’ll be worth the price of admission.