Ninja Assassin Black Carpet Mayhem - Dread Central
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Ninja Assassin Black Carpet Mayhem



Well, even though Ninja Assassin may not exactly be a horror flick, around these parts we find ninjas and gratuitous violence pretty badass. All that being said, Dread Central sent out the team of Heather Wixson and Brian Smith to cover the black carpet premiere of the movie last Thursday night at the historic Mann’s Chinese Theater.

The carpet was chock full of some of Hollywood’s biggest Asian stars and featured a slew of live ninjas on hand to give the event some atmosphere. Check out the pics and video below from the Ninja Assassin premiere, and keep your eyes peeled for a review and an in-depth interview with director James McTeigue.

Ninja Assassin Red Carpet Mayhem

Ninja Assassin Red Carpet Mayhem

Ninja Assassin Red Carpet Mayhem

Ninja Assassin Red Carpet Mayhem

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Claire Foy Refuses to Cooperate in New Clip from Steven Soderbergh’s Unsane



We have already shared with you guys a number of clips from director Steven Soderbergh’s new horror-thriller Unsane starring Claire Foy, Juno Temple, and Amy Irving (Carrie). Not that that’s a bad thing…

But all the same, today is no different as, you guessed it, we have yet another Unsane clip for your viewing pleasure. The clip is called “Refusing to Cooperate” and it features star Claire Foy, you guessed it, refusing to cooperate.

All jokes aside I am looking forward to checking out this new psychological thriller once it hits theaters tomorrow, so give the new clip below and then let us know what you think!

Unsane is directed by Steven Soderbergh from a script written by Jonathan Bernstein & James Greer and stars Claire Foy, Joshua Leonard, Jay Pharoah, Juno Temple, Aimee Mullins, and Amy Irving.

The film hits theaters nationwide March 23, 2018.


A young woman is involuntarily committed to a mental institution where she is confronted by her greatest fear–but is it real, or is it a product of her delusion?


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SXSW 2018: Wildling Review – A Fresh and Mature Take on Werewolves



Starring Bel Powley, Liv Tyler, Brad Dourif, Collin Kelly-Sordelet

Written by Fritz Böhm and Florian Eder

Directed by Fritz Böhm

Wildling follows Anna (Powley) who was raised in captivity by her “daddy” (Dourif), only to be thrust into the real world as a young woman with no concept or preparation for anything she sees or experiences, both in her surroundings and within her own body. Staying with Sheriff Ellen Cooper (Tyler) and her younger brother Ray (Kelly-Sordelet), Anna must acclimate in short time to the expectations of those around her, making this coming-of-age tale difficult because she is at such a disadvantage. However, we quickly learn that Anna is no ordinary person in that she is not a person at all: she is a Wildling, a werewolf-like creature whose transformation was being held back by Dourif’s injections.

What makes Wildling so interesting is how the transformation of Powley into the titular character twists the traditional werewolf mechanism into a metaphor for Anna’s own metamorphosis from a young girl into a formidable and entirely capable, albeit not human, woman. That the men of the small town that this film takes place in see this as a threat is not a subtlety that is meant to be passed over. Even in her innocence, Anna does not succumb to the demands and pressures of those around her, fending off a near rape by a local high school boy and standing up to her “daddy” as she realizes her own self worth.

Powley plays her role with charming confused innocence while Tyler plays the mother to Dourif’s “daddy”. She takes on the role of helping teach Anna what being a young woman is all about, from buying her tampons to giving her advice on what kinds of boys to avoid. Dourif, while always darkly charismatic and captivating, pulls deep into his acting chops for this role, bringing a nuanced representation of patriarchal control coupled with an inability to understand his “daughter” and her needs.

Beautifully filmed by Toby Oliver (Get Out, Insidious: The Last Key), Wildling immerses viewers in an almost fairy tale-like world. The town feels like a secluded berg while the surrounding forest teems with life and a magical air hovers in its branches. That being said, the film sometimes gets a bit too dark to see properly and the music is largely forgettable. Still, those minor complaints aside, Wildling is a wonderfully fresh take on what the werewolf subgenre has to offer.

  • Wildling


Wildling takes traditional the werewolf transformation mechanism and uses it as the foundation for a more immediate and relatable story, one that will especially resonate with female audiences.

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Kip Weeks, Original Man in the Mask, Slashes The Strangers: Prey at Night




We need to quit the knee-jerk hatred towards sequels; recent follow-ups like Ouija: Origin of Evil, The Conjuring 2, and Annabelle: Creation prove that creative ideas and talented directors can exceed expectations set by an original.

But we can’t give sequels a free pass to be mediocre either. For example, the response to the follow-up to Bryan Bertino’s home invasion masterpiece, The Strangers: Prey at Night, recently debuted to extremely mixed reviews. Pessimists bemoan, “What did you expect? Most sequels are unabashed cash-grabs!” In the case of The Strangers, I expected a lot more.

Fans of the 2008 shocker have been clamoring for a sequel for years, but no one wanted the wait to end with the unceremonious dispatches of some of the 21st Century’s most iconic new villains. I’m talking about the titular Strangers themselves, the murderous trio dubbed Dollface, Pin-Up, and The Man in the Mask.

While attempts to give characters like Michael Myers and Leatherface backstories have backfired by turning manifestations of evil into melodramatic anti-heroes (thus demystified and deflating their sources of terror), such an endeavor isn’t always a liability. In the case of Prey at Night, it should have been considered a necessity. The first Strangers concluded with hints that Dollface was conflicted; simultaneously, the juxtaposition of Mormon missionaries hinted at cultish motivations (beyond the infliction of random acts of violence).

While the unknown was key to the terror of The Strangers, it was a one trick pony; the franchise could only flourish with an expansion of the implied mythology created in 2008. Of course, Prey director Johannes Roberts’ decision to assassinate these compelling masked invaders proves he really had no intention of turning Bertino’s original into a franchise, something that left me feeling extremely disheartened.

And I’m not the only one; among the lambasts of fans and critics comes a vocal response from the original Man in the Mask, Kip Weeks (replaced by Damian Maffei in Prey). I caught up with him after he chimed in on a negative review in Variety. And lest you think it’s a case of sour grapes, I wouldn’t be sharing his insights if I didn’t agree fully.

Dread Central: We were all bummed the original Strangers actors weren’t recast. Now that Prey at Night has premiered to mostly negative reviews, can we get your thoughts? Specifically, why does Prey fail where the original Strangers succeeded?

Kip Weeks: I had a long back and forth with one of the producers. I told him, “You destroyed an art form.”

DC: Did you give him any specifics?

KP: I told him: “You have no idea what it means to create a character from its core. You made a piece of shit, jump scare movie without realizing you had gold in your hands.”

DC: What should the producers have done differently?

KP: They could have made a movie about “The Strangers”: where they came from and why they became killers. Instead, they made it about some bullshit family and wasted Christina Hendricks’ acting skills. The fans wanted depth and story and honesty. They gave them shit.


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